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Ishana, deity of the northeast
Place of Origin: India, Khajuraho area, Madhya Pradesh state
Date: approx. 1100-1150
Materials: Sandstone
Dimensions: H. 26 1/2 in x W. 11 1/4 in x D. 6 in, H. 67.3 cm x W. 28.6 cm x D. 15.2 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B62S18+
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 3

Description

Label:

With two of its four arms holding a trident and a snake, this figure would seem to be the Hindu deity Shiva, who often carries these emblems. The bull at the figure's feet also suggests the bull that accompanies Shiva.

This figure is not Shiva, though, but Ishana, the guardian deity of the northeast, who shares some of Shiva's characteristics. The gesture of his right hand and the water jug in his left are associated not with Shiva, however, but with Ishana.

Depictions of the guardian deities of the eight directions (east, southeast, etc.) were often placed near the corners of Hindu temples. They symbolically protected the temple as well as projecting its sacred power to all parts of the world.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Indian and South-East Asian Stone Sculptures from the Avery Brundage Collection", Pasadena Art Museum 11/22/1969-2/1/1970, The Miami Art Center 2/26/1970-4/15/1970, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts 5/6/1970-6/21/1970, Joslyn Art Museum 7/7/1970-10/15/1970, Lakeview Center for the Arts and Sciences 11/1/1970-12/31/1970.

"The Indian Pantheon: Sculpture of India and Southeast Asia", University Art Museum, Berkeley, 1/27/1979 - 4/1/1979

"Indian Stone Sculpture ", SFO Airport, 11/15/1985 - 3/1986

San Antiono Museum of Art 1/15/92 -
Label:

With two of its four arms holding a trident and a snake, this figure would seem to be the Hindu deity Shiva, who often carries these emblems. The bull at the figure's feet also suggests the bull that accompanies Shiva.

This figure is not Shiva, though, but Ishana, the guardian deity of the northeast, who shares some of Shiva's characteristics. The gesture of his right hand and the water jug in his left are associated not with Shiva, however, but with Ishana.

Depictions of the guardian deities of the eight directions (east, southeast, etc.) were often placed near the corners of Hindu temples. They symbolically protected the temple as well as projecting its sacred power to all parts of the world.


Exhibition History: "Indian and South-East Asian Stone Sculptures from the Avery Brundage Collection", Pasadena Art Museum 11/22/1969-2/1/1970, The Miami Art Center 2/26/1970-4/15/1970, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts 5/6/1970-6/21/1970, Joslyn Art Museum 7/7/1970-10/15/1970, Lakeview Center for the Arts and Sciences 11/1/1970-12/31/1970.

"The Indian Pantheon: Sculpture of India and Southeast Asia", University Art Museum, Berkeley, 1/27/1979 - 4/1/1979

"Indian Stone Sculpture ", SFO Airport, 11/15/1985 - 3/1986

San Antiono Museum of Art 1/15/92 -