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The twenty-four Jain teachers
Place of Origin: India, Gujarat state or Rajasthan state
Date: dated 1492 (V.S. 1549)
Materials: Bronze
Dimensions: H. 21 1/2 in x W. 14 1/2 in x D. 6 3/4 in, H. 54.6 cm x W. 36.8 cm x D. 17.1 cm
Credit Line: Museum purchase
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B69B11
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 3
Culture: Jain

Description

Label:

Jainism's ultimate goal of escaping rebirth is represented by its twenty-four revered teachers, all of whom achieved such victory themselves. These teachers are represented in this image by the three large figures as well as by the surrounding arch of twenty-one smaller figures seated or standing in meditation. Special attention was paid to the central and largest figure, who is honored by various celestials hovering near his head. Jain teachers can usually be identified in sculptures by certain accompanying features, such as animals and nature deities. A small image below the feet of the central figure might be a buffalo, which is associated with Vasupujya, the twelfth Jain teacher.

This bronze was made for a wealthy patron-probably one of the many merchants who practiced and supported Jainism. It was either placed in a domestic shrine or dedicated to a temple where such images were honored through the presentation of offerings and recitation of hymns.


More Information

Inscriptions: On back, at the base: The inscription mentions the year V.S. 1549 (1492 CE) and the month of Jyestha (one of the summer months). It mentions the name of the donor, the monk Jinacandradeva in the lineage of Kumdakumda in the mula samgha (order). The inscription was read by Phyllis Granoff for Robert del Bonta. 9-3-2009
Exhibition History: "Pearls on a String - Artists, Patrons, and Poets at the Great Islamic Courts", Asian Art Museum, February 26, 2016-May 8, 2016
Label:

Jainism's ultimate goal of escaping rebirth is represented by its twenty-four revered teachers, all of whom achieved such victory themselves. These teachers are represented in this image by the three large figures as well as by the surrounding arch of twenty-one smaller figures seated or standing in meditation. Special attention was paid to the central and largest figure, who is honored by various celestials hovering near his head. Jain teachers can usually be identified in sculptures by certain accompanying features, such as animals and nature deities. A small image below the feet of the central figure might be a buffalo, which is associated with Vasupujya, the twelfth Jain teacher.

This bronze was made for a wealthy patron-probably one of the many merchants who practiced and supported Jainism. It was either placed in a domestic shrine or dedicated to a temple where such images were honored through the presentation of offerings and recitation of hymns.


Inscriptions: On back, at the base: The inscription mentions the year V.S. 1549 (1492 CE) and the month of Jyestha (one of the summer months). It mentions the name of the donor, the monk Jinacandradeva in the lineage of Kumdakumda in the mula samgha (order). The inscription was read by Phyllis Granoff for Robert del Bonta. 9-3-2009
Exhibition History: "Pearls on a String - Artists, Patrons, and Poets at the Great Islamic Courts", Asian Art Museum, February 26, 2016-May 8, 2016