Online Collection

Collections



Asian Art Museum Logo
Female celestial holding a fly whisk and a water pot, one of a set of two
Place of Origin: India, Mt. Abu, Rajasthan state
Date: 1100-1300
Materials: Marble with traces of pigment
Dimensions: H. 29 3/4 in x W. 9 1/4 in x D. 6 1/4 in, H. 75.6 cm x W. 23.5 cm x D. 15.9 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B61S46+
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 3
Culture: Jain

Description

Label: This fly whisk bearer once graced the interior of a Jain temple. The visual vocabulary of Jain temples is similar to those of their Hindu and Buddhist counterparts, where beautiful divine females also appear regularly amidst the sculptural decoration. In the Jain case, such heavenly beings contribute to the temple's general conception as a celestial assembly hall. It is in such halls that each Jain teacher preached after attaining enlightenment. White marble was used extensively in some Jain temples built in northern and western India during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Pigment traces on the sculpture indicate that their interiors were elaborately painted.

More Information

Exhibition History: "Indian and South-East Asian Stone Sculptures from the Avery Brundage Collection", Pasadena Art Museum 11/22/1969-2/1/1970, The Miami Art Center 2/26/1970-4/15/1970, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts 5/6/1970-6/21/1970, Joslyn Art Museum 7/7/1970-10/15/1970, Lakeview Center for the Arts and Sciences 11/1/1970-12/31/1970.

"Indian Stone Sculpture ", SFO Airport, 11/15/1985 - 3/1986
Label: This fly whisk bearer once graced the interior of a Jain temple. The visual vocabulary of Jain temples is similar to those of their Hindu and Buddhist counterparts, where beautiful divine females also appear regularly amidst the sculptural decoration. In the Jain case, such heavenly beings contribute to the temple's general conception as a celestial assembly hall. It is in such halls that each Jain teacher preached after attaining enlightenment. White marble was used extensively in some Jain temples built in northern and western India during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Pigment traces on the sculpture indicate that their interiors were elaborately painted.
Exhibition History: "Indian and South-East Asian Stone Sculptures from the Avery Brundage Collection", Pasadena Art Museum 11/22/1969-2/1/1970, The Miami Art Center 2/26/1970-4/15/1970, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts 5/6/1970-6/21/1970, Joslyn Art Museum 7/7/1970-10/15/1970, Lakeview Center for the Arts and Sciences 11/1/1970-12/31/1970.

"Indian Stone Sculpture ", SFO Airport, 11/15/1985 - 3/1986