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Dogs
Place of Origin: China
Date: approx. 1900
Historical Period: Qing dynasty (1644-1911)-early Republic period (1900-1940)
Materials: Nephrite
Dimensions: H. 1 in x W. 2 1/4 in x D. 1 5/8 in, H. 2.54 cm x W. 5.71 cm x D. 4.13 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Jade And Stones
Object Number: B69J38
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Two dogs emerge from a pure-green hetian jade. The solid, compact form was intended as a paperweight for a scholar's desk. One dog bites the other's ear, but the bodies are tightly joined, with no separation. The features are simply rendered with round relief and plain cuts. The underside shows part of a tail beside all eight paws incised with toes and pads.

Qing artists experimented with portraying animals from all angles. The famous ten foreign breeds of dogs treasured by the Qianlong emperor were illustrated by Lang Shining (1688–1766) (National Palace Museum, Taipei 1994, vol. 14, plates 61–77). His ability to portray animals realistically, adopted from Western oil paintings, must have influenced his contemporaries. The piece shown here evokes the energetic attempt to capture the true nature of animals.


Label:

Two dogs emerge from a pure-green hetian jade. The solid, compact form was intended as a paperweight for a scholar's desk. One dog bites the other's ear, but the bodies are tightly joined, with no separation. The features are simply rendered with round relief and plain cuts. The underside shows part of a tail beside all eight paws incised with toes and pads.

Qing artists experimented with portraying animals from all angles. The famous ten foreign breeds of dogs treasured by the Qianlong emperor were illustrated by Lang Shining (1688–1766) (National Palace Museum, Taipei 1994, vol. 14, plates 61–77). His ability to portray animals realistically, adopted from Western oil paintings, must have influenced his contemporaries. The piece shown here evokes the energetic attempt to capture the true nature of animals.