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Dish with two fish
Place of Origin: China, Jiangxi province
Historical Period: Ming dynasty (1368-1644), Reign of the Wanli emperor (1573-1620)
Materials: Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration
Style or Ware: qinghua ware
Dimensions: H. 1 3/8 in x Diam. 7 in, H. 3.5 cm x Diam. 17.8 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: B60P1679
On Display: No

Description

Label:

明朝篔曆江皁景德汒窯梮絏撦稅盤

Traditionally fish—(yu 撦"abundance" (yu 曨—are thought to swim in pairs and to be happy in their environment. The motif of a pair of fish stands not only for abundance but also for marital bliss.


In Chinese symbolism, fish are associated with happiness. On this dish, the artist has arranged five fish in different positions swimming in grass on the exterior. Two more fish swimming among aquatic plants are placed on the interior base and are painted spontaneously, one in profile and the other as seen from the top, showing its back. Consistent with those dishes made at jingdezhen, this piece was either ordered by a studio in Dehua, Fujian or simply applied with the auspicious phrase which includes the characters "de hua.." The trend of writing the names of private studios or phrases implying good wishes on ceramics had gained increasing popularity since the Jiajing-Wanli period, and the practice continued through the Qing dynasty. The four character mark within the square reads dehua changchun ("virtue, culture and long life") and the four characters to the side of the square read wanli nianzao ("produced during the Wanli period").

More Information

Marks: Wanli mark and square-framed four-character mark with four additional characters disposed around the square
Exhibition History: Hidden Meanings: Symbolism in Chinese Imperial Arts, October 7- December 31, 2006
"Hidden Meanings: Symbolism in Chinese Art," SFO United Terminal, June 4, 2010 - January 19, 2011
Label:

明朝篔曆江皁景德汒窯梮絏撦稅盤

Traditionally fish—(yu 撦"abundance" (yu 曨—are thought to swim in pairs and to be happy in their environment. The motif of a pair of fish stands not only for abundance but also for marital bliss.


In Chinese symbolism, fish are associated with happiness. On this dish, the artist has arranged five fish in different positions swimming in grass on the exterior. Two more fish swimming among aquatic plants are placed on the interior base and are painted spontaneously, one in profile and the other as seen from the top, showing its back. Consistent with those dishes made at jingdezhen, this piece was either ordered by a studio in Dehua, Fujian or simply applied with the auspicious phrase which includes the characters "de hua.." The trend of writing the names of private studios or phrases implying good wishes on ceramics had gained increasing popularity since the Jiajing-Wanli period, and the practice continued through the Qing dynasty. The four character mark within the square reads dehua changchun ("virtue, culture and long life") and the four characters to the side of the square read wanli nianzao ("produced during the Wanli period").
Marks: Wanli mark and square-framed four-character mark with four additional characters disposed around the square
Exhibition History: Hidden Meanings: Symbolism in Chinese Imperial Arts, October 7- December 31, 2006
"Hidden Meanings: Symbolism in Chinese Art," SFO United Terminal, June 4, 2010 - January 19, 2011