Online Collection

Collections



Asian Art Museum Logo
Vessel in the shape of a stag
Place of Origin: Northern Iran, probably Marlik or Kaluraz
Date: Iron Age II (Iran) (1200-800 BCE)
Materials: Burnished earthenware
Style or Ware: Marlik
Dimensions: H. 11 1/2 in x W. 10 1/2 in x D. 4 1/4 in, H. 29.2 cm x W. 26.7 cm x D. 10.8 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: West Asian Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: B62P9+
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 7
Culture: Amlash

Description

Label:

Marlik, in northern Iran, is a particularly important site. Located between the Caspian Sea and Elburz mountains, the area benefited from a warm climate with wooded forests and dense vegetation favorable to civilization. Tomb excavations at the site of Marlik yielded fascinating reddish and gray hollow pottery figurines in the shapes of humans and animals with spouts. This reddish-brown stag's head forms a spout, which was probably used for pouring rather than drinking. Its stocky, full shape with a wide back and four stubby legs would have made it easy to handle. The earthenware was burnished, which means that it was rubbed while damp with a spoon-like tool before firing. This process makes it smooth to the touch.

Wares such as this one are often called "Amlash" after a small Caspian Sea village in southeastern Gilan province. Amlash has been a point of entry for the international antiquities market and has been used to describe unprovenanced antiquities, whether from Gilan province or not.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Near Eastern Masterpieces", San Antonio Museum of Art, 5/16/1987 - 1/4/1988
"Ancient Middle Eastern Objects" wall case (renewable annually), deYoung Museum, 4/13/1988 - 8/26/1993
Permanent exhibit display (renewable annually) at deYoung Museum, 10/1/1993 - 3/8/1996
"Fakes, Copies, and Question Marks" 9/25/04--3/27/05, Asian Art Museum
Label:

Marlik, in northern Iran, is a particularly important site. Located between the Caspian Sea and Elburz mountains, the area benefited from a warm climate with wooded forests and dense vegetation favorable to civilization. Tomb excavations at the site of Marlik yielded fascinating reddish and gray hollow pottery figurines in the shapes of humans and animals with spouts. This reddish-brown stag's head forms a spout, which was probably used for pouring rather than drinking. Its stocky, full shape with a wide back and four stubby legs would have made it easy to handle. The earthenware was burnished, which means that it was rubbed while damp with a spoon-like tool before firing. This process makes it smooth to the touch.

Wares such as this one are often called "Amlash" after a small Caspian Sea village in southeastern Gilan province. Amlash has been a point of entry for the international antiquities market and has been used to describe unprovenanced antiquities, whether from Gilan province or not.


Exhibition History: "Near Eastern Masterpieces", San Antonio Museum of Art, 5/16/1987 - 1/4/1988
"Ancient Middle Eastern Objects" wall case (renewable annually), deYoung Museum, 4/13/1988 - 8/26/1993
Permanent exhibit display (renewable annually) at deYoung Museum, 10/1/1993 - 3/8/1996
"Fakes, Copies, and Question Marks" 9/25/04--3/27/05, Asian Art Museum