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Architectural panel
Place of Origin: Afghanistan, Royal Palace of Mas'ud III, Ghazni
Date: approx. 1100-1115
Historical Period: Reign of Mas'ud III (1099-1115)
Materials: Marble
Dimensions: H. 29 1/4 in x W. 17 in x D. 4 in, H. 74.3 cm x W. 43.2 cm x D. 10.2 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Shawn and Brook Byers and Peter Marks in honor of Avery Brundage's Centennial
Department: West Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B87S3
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 7

Description

Label: This panel is part of a wide marble band that once encircled the central courtyard of the royal palace of Sultan Ala' al-Daulah Mas'ud III (born 1061), the twelfth ruler of the Ghaznavid dynasty. The band comprised more than five hundred such panels and was 820 feet (250 meters) in length. Only forty-four panels were found in their original position. Many others, including this one, had been reused elsewhere in Ghazni after the palace fell into disuse. This is one of the few complete examples known to exist outside Afghanistan. Each panel carried a small part of an overall inscription, a poem eulogizing the ancestors of Mas'ud III and describing his achievements. This panel is one of the first examples on which the Persian language was used instead of Arabic for a monumental inscription. Originally, the inscription was painted in ultramarine blue against a red background, a common color scheme at the time (the colors have since deteriorated).
Label: This panel is part of a wide marble band that once encircled the central courtyard of the royal palace of Sultan Ala' al-Daulah Mas'ud III (born 1061), the twelfth ruler of the Ghaznavid dynasty. The band comprised more than five hundred such panels and was 820 feet (250 meters) in length. Only forty-four panels were found in their original position. Many others, including this one, had been reused elsewhere in Ghazni after the palace fell into disuse. This is one of the few complete examples known to exist outside Afghanistan. Each panel carried a small part of an overall inscription, a poem eulogizing the ancestors of Mas'ud III and describing his achievements. This panel is one of the first examples on which the Persian language was used instead of Arabic for a monumental inscription. Originally, the inscription was painted in ultramarine blue against a red background, a common color scheme at the time (the colors have since deteriorated).