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A bowl with One Hundred Flowers motif
Place of Origin: China, Jingdezhen, Jiangxi province
Historical Period: Qing dynasty (1644-1911), Reign of the Jiaqing emperor (1796-1820)
Materials: Porcelain with overglaze polychrome decoration
Style or Ware: fencai
Dimensions: H. 2 5/8 in x Diam. 5 1/8 in, H. 6.7 cm x Diam. 13.0 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: B60P2095
On Display: Yes
Location: Loggia 4

Description

Label: This piece revives the "hundred-flower ground" once made by the Jiaqing imperial shop. Commonly used flowers applied on an earlier illustrated piece (cat. no. 665), including peony, lotus, chrysanthemum, magnolia, peach, yellow hibiscus, apricot, morning glory, rose camellia, day lily, pinks, narcissus, wisteria, and more, were massed together in bloom. The enamels were fired to a proper lustrous quality in even layers. The color tonality, dominated by lightly shaded yellow, green, and blue, creates a tender subtlety.

More Information

Marks: Jiaqing mark and underglaze blue six-character mark in three columns
Exhibition History: "Chinese Treasures from the Avery Brundage Collection", Asia House Gallery (New York) 1/18/1968-3/3/1968, Detroit Institute of Arts 3/26/1968-5/7/1968, The Art Institute of Chicago 6/5/1968-7/7/1968, Honolulu Academy of Arts 8/1/1968-9/15/1968, Seattle Art Museum 10/15/1968-11/24/1968, Portland Art Museum 12/5/1968-12/27/1968, M. H. De Young Memorial Museum 1/15/1969-2/16/1969

"Gems of Chinese Art: From the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, The Avery Brundage Collection", Hong Kong Museum of Art, 5/17/1983-8/7/1983.

"The Hundred Flowers: Botanical Motifs in Chinese Art", Asian Art Museum, March 24-June 25, 1985

"Hidden Meanings: Symbolism in Chinese Imperial Arts", Asian Art Museum, October 7- December 31, 2006

"Flower Power", Asian Art Museum, 6/23/2017-10/1/2017
Label: This piece revives the "hundred-flower ground" once made by the Jiaqing imperial shop. Commonly used flowers applied on an earlier illustrated piece (cat. no. 665), including peony, lotus, chrysanthemum, magnolia, peach, yellow hibiscus, apricot, morning glory, rose camellia, day lily, pinks, narcissus, wisteria, and more, were massed together in bloom. The enamels were fired to a proper lustrous quality in even layers. The color tonality, dominated by lightly shaded yellow, green, and blue, creates a tender subtlety.
Marks: Jiaqing mark and underglaze blue six-character mark in three columns
Exhibition History: "Chinese Treasures from the Avery Brundage Collection", Asia House Gallery (New York) 1/18/1968-3/3/1968, Detroit Institute of Arts 3/26/1968-5/7/1968, The Art Institute of Chicago 6/5/1968-7/7/1968, Honolulu Academy of Arts 8/1/1968-9/15/1968, Seattle Art Museum 10/15/1968-11/24/1968, Portland Art Museum 12/5/1968-12/27/1968, M. H. De Young Memorial Museum 1/15/1969-2/16/1969

"Gems of Chinese Art: From the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, The Avery Brundage Collection", Hong Kong Museum of Art, 5/17/1983-8/7/1983.

"The Hundred Flowers: Botanical Motifs in Chinese Art", Asian Art Museum, March 24-June 25, 1985

"Hidden Meanings: Symbolism in Chinese Imperial Arts", Asian Art Museum, October 7- December 31, 2006

"Flower Power", Asian Art Museum, 6/23/2017-10/1/2017