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Dog chasing
犬追物図屏風
Place of Origin: Japan
Date: approx. 1640
Object Name: Six panel folding screen
Materials: Ink, colors, and gold on paper
Dimensions: H. 61 1/2 in x W. 144 in, H. 156.2 cm x W. 365.7 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B60D1
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 27

Description

Label: Shooting dogs from horseback was a form of samurai training that began in the Muromachi period (1392–1573). During the peaceful 1600s this activity was revived as a samurai sporting event that attracted many spectators. As a sport, dog chasing involved two teams of seventeen participants each. The riders used softly padded arrows in order not to seriously hurt the dog, which was released within a circle of rope to begin the game. A strike on the dog‘s torso scored points; strikes on the head or legs did not count. The winning team usually received prizes of lengths of white silk cloth.

This screen shows the game in progress, with the judges sitting in the building at the left of the field. As many as eighteen pairs of screens on this subject are known in Japan and the West. Later examples, such as this pair, show greater numbers of spectators, probably reflecting the growing popularity of the sport.


More Information

Exhibition History: "The Art of Wine in East Asia", Asian Art Museum, Nov. 5, 1985-Jan. 21, 1986
"Japanese Paintings from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", organized by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc. (Nikkei), Matsuzakaya Art Museum, Nagoya (3/2/1995-4/9/1995), Takashimaya Art Gallery, Tokyo (4/20/1995-5/9/1995), Takashimaya Grand Hall, Kyoto (6/30/1995-7/11/1995), Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama (8/2/1995-9/17/1995)
Label: Shooting dogs from horseback was a form of samurai training that began in the Muromachi period (1392–1573). During the peaceful 1600s this activity was revived as a samurai sporting event that attracted many spectators. As a sport, dog chasing involved two teams of seventeen participants each. The riders used softly padded arrows in order not to seriously hurt the dog, which was released within a circle of rope to begin the game. A strike on the dog‘s torso scored points; strikes on the head or legs did not count. The winning team usually received prizes of lengths of white silk cloth.

This screen shows the game in progress, with the judges sitting in the building at the left of the field. As many as eighteen pairs of screens on this subject are known in Japan and the West. Later examples, such as this pair, show greater numbers of spectators, probably reflecting the growing popularity of the sport.


Exhibition History: "The Art of Wine in East Asia", Asian Art Museum, Nov. 5, 1985-Jan. 21, 1986
"Japanese Paintings from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", organized by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc. (Nikkei), Matsuzakaya Art Museum, Nagoya (3/2/1995-4/9/1995), Takashimaya Art Gallery, Tokyo (4/20/1995-5/9/1995), Takashimaya Grand Hall, Kyoto (6/30/1995-7/11/1995), Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama (8/2/1995-9/17/1995)