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Crowned Buddha in niche, a fragment of a votive stupa
Place of Origin: India, Bihar state
Date: approx. 1000-1100
Materials: Basalt
Style or Ware: Pala
Dimensions: H. 20 1/4 x W. 14 in x D. 4 3/4 in, H. 51.4 cm x W. 35.6 cm x D. 12 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B60S86+
On Display: No

Description

Label: Crowned Buddhas and Stupas The face of the crowned Buddha in this sculpture has been damaged, but his crown and hand gesture (mudra) suggest that this is Vairochana, the Buddha of the central region of the mandala. Although fragmentary, this sculpture was probably one panel from a larger stupa, a monument often built to contain the remains of advanced Buddhist meditators. Stone stupas appear throughout the art of Palaperiod India (eighth–twelfth centuries), and the associated imagery of Vairochana likely contributed to crowned Buddha imagery that appears in Southeast Asia.

More Information

Exhibition History: Enter the Mandala: Cosmic Centers and Mental Maps of Himalayan Buddhism, March 14 — October 26, 2014, Asian Art Museum
Label: Crowned Buddhas and Stupas The face of the crowned Buddha in this sculpture has been damaged, but his crown and hand gesture (mudra) suggest that this is Vairochana, the Buddha of the central region of the mandala. Although fragmentary, this sculpture was probably one panel from a larger stupa, a monument often built to contain the remains of advanced Buddhist meditators. Stone stupas appear throughout the art of Palaperiod India (eighth–twelfth centuries), and the associated imagery of Vairochana likely contributed to crowned Buddha imagery that appears in Southeast Asia.
Exhibition History: Enter the Mandala: Cosmic Centers and Mental Maps of Himalayan Buddhism, March 14 — October 26, 2014, Asian Art Museum