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The cosmic Buddha Ratnasambhava
南方寶生佛像 掛像 布地彩繪 元代 西藏薩迦寺
Place of Origin: Tibet, Sakya Monastery
Date: 1200-1300
Historical Period: Yuan dynasty (1271–1368)
Object Name: Thangka
Materials: Colors on cotton
Dimensions: H. 32 in x W. 25 3/8 in, H. 81.3 cm x W. 65.4 cm (image), H. 54 in x W. 37 1/4 in, H. 137.2 cm x W. 94.6 cm (overall)
Credit Line: Museum purchase, City Arts Trust Fund
Department: Himalayan Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: 1991.2
On Display: No

Description

Label:

The Mystery of the Crowned Buddha

Early images of the Buddha show him as a humble monk. But about a thousand years ago, images of crowned and jeweled Buddhas appeared across Asia. What historical or artistic forces might have shaped this dramatic royal Buddha imagery? Buddhist images wearing jewelry were not new to the Lightning Vehicle; bodhisattvas, or Buddhas-to-be, had worn jewelry for centuries. Buddhas, on the other hand, had not.

Here, however, the directional Buddha Ratnasambhava wears five kinds of jewelry, from necklace to anklet to crown. These adornments symbolize each of the directional Buddhas, so all five Buddhas are implicit in this one image, and the whole is present in its parts.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Wisdom and Compassion: The Sacred Art of Tibet", Asian Art Museum of San Francisco (4/17/1991-8/18/1991), IBM Gallery of Science and Art, New York (10/15/1991-12/28/1991), Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (2/15/1992-4/28/1992)

Enter the Mandala: Cosmic Centers and Mental Maps of Himalayan Buddhism, March 14 — October 26, 2014, Asian Art Museum
Label:

The Mystery of the Crowned Buddha

Early images of the Buddha show him as a humble monk. But about a thousand years ago, images of crowned and jeweled Buddhas appeared across Asia. What historical or artistic forces might have shaped this dramatic royal Buddha imagery? Buddhist images wearing jewelry were not new to the Lightning Vehicle; bodhisattvas, or Buddhas-to-be, had worn jewelry for centuries. Buddhas, on the other hand, had not.

Here, however, the directional Buddha Ratnasambhava wears five kinds of jewelry, from necklace to anklet to crown. These adornments symbolize each of the directional Buddhas, so all five Buddhas are implicit in this one image, and the whole is present in its parts.


Exhibition History: "Wisdom and Compassion: The Sacred Art of Tibet", Asian Art Museum of San Francisco (4/17/1991-8/18/1991), IBM Gallery of Science and Art, New York (10/15/1991-12/28/1991), Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (2/15/1992-4/28/1992)

Enter the Mandala: Cosmic Centers and Mental Maps of Himalayan Buddhism, March 14 — October 26, 2014, Asian Art Museum