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Poem in semi–cursive script
明朝 張瑞圖 行草書五言律詩軸 絹本水墨
Date: 1590-1641
Historical Period: Ming dynasty (1368-1644)
Object Name: Hanging scroll
Materials: Ink on silk
Dimensions: H. 74 1/2 in x W. 15 7/8 in, H. 189.2 cm x W. 40.3 cm (overall); H. 43 in x W. 9 7/8 in, H. 109.2 cm x W. 25.1 cm (image)
Credit Line: The Yeh Family Collection
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: 2016.257
On Display: No

Description

Label: When writing, most calligraphers prefer to hold the brush upright and write with the central fine tip. But Zhang Ruitu, unlike most calligraphers, insisted on holding the brush at an angle and writing with its sides. As a result, he created an idiosyncratic mannerism characterized by sharp strokes, angular turns, uneasy movements, and restless visual effect. Regarded as one of the four great calligraphers of the late Ming period in China, Zhang was also admired in Japan. Many of his works were taken to Japan in 1654 by the Chinese monk Yinyuan Longqi (known as Ingen Ryuki in Japan, 1592–1673), who later established the Obaku Zen Buddhist sect there.

More Information

Signature/Seal: Signature: Written by Zhang Ruitu from Guoting 果亭張瑞圖書。
Seal: Zhang Ruitu yin (Seal of Zhang Ruitu); Zuozhu guo shaoshi dxueshi zhang (Seal of Great Doctor, senior master at the Left Column of the State); Qingzhen tang (Studio of Qingzhen)
Collector seal: Guo Yimin yin (Seal of Guo Yimin)
Inscriptions: Thin waters flow within turbulent rivers inflow thin water 剩水滄江破,
Destroyed mountains exposed to fractured rocks 殘山礙石開;
Greens battered by the wind, willows broken綠垂風折柳。
Red blossoms bear plump cherries after the rains红绽雨肥梅,
Silver nail-guards used to play the zither zheng銀甲彈箏用,
Golden fish traded for wine金魚換酒來;
Excitement diverted, no need to cleanse the surroundings 興移無洒掃,
Sitting on green moss at will 隨意坐蒼苔。

Label: When writing, most calligraphers prefer to hold the brush upright and write with the central fine tip. But Zhang Ruitu, unlike most calligraphers, insisted on holding the brush at an angle and writing with its sides. As a result, he created an idiosyncratic mannerism characterized by sharp strokes, angular turns, uneasy movements, and restless visual effect. Regarded as one of the four great calligraphers of the late Ming period in China, Zhang was also admired in Japan. Many of his works were taken to Japan in 1654 by the Chinese monk Yinyuan Longqi (known as Ingen Ryuki in Japan, 1592–1673), who later established the Obaku Zen Buddhist sect there.
Signature/Seal: Signature: Written by Zhang Ruitu from Guoting 果亭張瑞圖書。
Seal: Zhang Ruitu yin (Seal of Zhang Ruitu); Zuozhu guo shaoshi dxueshi zhang (Seal of Great Doctor, senior master at the Left Column of the State); Qingzhen tang (Studio of Qingzhen)
Collector seal: Guo Yimin yin (Seal of Guo Yimin)
Inscriptions: Thin waters flow within turbulent rivers inflow thin water 剩水滄江破,
Destroyed mountains exposed to fractured rocks 殘山礙石開;
Greens battered by the wind, willows broken綠垂風折柳。
Red blossoms bear plump cherries after the rains红绽雨肥梅,
Silver nail-guards used to play the zither zheng銀甲彈箏用,
Golden fish traded for wine金魚換酒來;
Excitement diverted, no need to cleanse the surroundings 興移無洒掃,
Sitting on green moss at will 隨意坐蒼苔。