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Box for writing paper
料紙箱 江戸時代
Place of Origin: Japan
Date: 1615-1800
Historical Period: Edo period (1615-1868)
Materials: Lacquer and gold on bamboo
Dimensions: H. 4 in x W. 12 in x D. 8 1/2 in, H. 10.2 cm x W. 30.5 cm x D. 21.6 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Decorative Arts
Object Number: B60M162.a-.b
On Display: No

Description

Label:

This lacquered writing-paper box is decorated with a motif of flying birds confined behind a net, or in an aviary. On its side, a cloisonné fitting with a ring originally held silk cords for tying the box together.

This box exemplifies three basic Japanese lacquer decoration techniques: hira (flat) makie, taka (raised) makie, and kirikane (cut sheet of metal). In the makie process, silver or gold powders (or flakes) are sprinkled on the painted lacquer pattern while it is still wet and acts as an adhering agent. When the decoration is raised to some thickness with repeated applications of lacquer and gold, the finished work is called taka (raised) makie. Kirikane, small pieces of silver, are arranged on the makie surface as additional decorative elements.


More Information

Exhibition History: "For the New Century: Japanese Treasures from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Japan Society, New York, 3/22/2000 - 7/9/2000

"Japanese Lacquerware", Asian Art Museum, 12/9/2015-7/17/2016
Label:

This lacquered writing-paper box is decorated with a motif of flying birds confined behind a net, or in an aviary. On its side, a cloisonné fitting with a ring originally held silk cords for tying the box together.

This box exemplifies three basic Japanese lacquer decoration techniques: hira (flat) makie, taka (raised) makie, and kirikane (cut sheet of metal). In the makie process, silver or gold powders (or flakes) are sprinkled on the painted lacquer pattern while it is still wet and acts as an adhering agent. When the decoration is raised to some thickness with repeated applications of lacquer and gold, the finished work is called taka (raised) makie. Kirikane, small pieces of silver, are arranged on the makie surface as additional decorative elements.


Exhibition History: "For the New Century: Japanese Treasures from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Japan Society, New York, 3/22/2000 - 7/9/2000

"Japanese Lacquerware", Asian Art Museum, 12/9/2015-7/17/2016