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Bird with long tail feathers
Date: approx. 1550-1575
Historical Period: Muromachi period (1392-1573)
Object Name: Hanging scroll
Materials: Ink and colors on paper
Dimensions: H. 18 5/8 in x W. 17 9/16 in, H. 47.2 cm x W. 44.6 cm (image); H. 55 1/2 in x W. 25 1/2 in, H. 141.0 cm x W. 64.8 cm (overall)
Credit Line: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Shorenstein
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B76D6
On Display: No

Description

Label: Artists of the Kano school drew inspiration for subjects like this one from imported Chinese paintings. Perched atop a gnarled camellia tree branch, a long-tailed bird turns to look up to its right. This domesticated songbird, a kind of magpie, is called "ribbons" in Chinese, a reference to tail feathers that resemble the silk ribbons of official seals or medals in China. In contrast to the branch, which is rendered in ink with minute dots suggesting lichen, the bird and flowers are painted with rich mineral colors and a profusion of detail. Artists working for China's imperial court used this style to mimic the forms of nature in as realistic a manner as possible: here, a sense of the bird's sleek, plump form; the leaves' smooth, curving shape; and the flowers' rippled petals and stiff, upright stamen.

More Information

Exhibition History: "San Francisco Bay Area Collects Asian Art: The Museum's 20th Anniversary Exhibition", Asian Art Museum, January 25 - March 4, 1986
"Japanese Paintings from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", organized by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc. (Nikkei), Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama (8/2/1995-9/17/1995)
"For the New Century: Japanese Treasures from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Japan Society, New York, 3/22/2000 - 7/9/2000
Label: Artists of the Kano school drew inspiration for subjects like this one from imported Chinese paintings. Perched atop a gnarled camellia tree branch, a long-tailed bird turns to look up to its right. This domesticated songbird, a kind of magpie, is called "ribbons" in Chinese, a reference to tail feathers that resemble the silk ribbons of official seals or medals in China. In contrast to the branch, which is rendered in ink with minute dots suggesting lichen, the bird and flowers are painted with rich mineral colors and a profusion of detail. Artists working for China's imperial court used this style to mimic the forms of nature in as realistic a manner as possible: here, a sense of the bird's sleek, plump form; the leaves' smooth, curving shape; and the flowers' rippled petals and stiff, upright stamen.
Exhibition History: "San Francisco Bay Area Collects Asian Art: The Museum's 20th Anniversary Exhibition", Asian Art Museum, January 25 - March 4, 1986
"Japanese Paintings from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", organized by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc. (Nikkei), Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama (8/2/1995-9/17/1995)
"For the New Century: Japanese Treasures from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Japan Society, New York, 3/22/2000 - 7/9/2000