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Pine, bamboo and plum, one of a pair
円山応挙筆 松竹梅図屏風 六曲一双 紙本墨画 江戸時代
Date: approx. 1700-1800
Historical Period: Edo period (1615-1868)
Object Name: Six panel folding screen
Materials: Ink and gold on paper
Dimensions: H. 64 3/4 in x W. 143 1/4 in, H. 164.5 cm x W. 363.8 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B60D56+
On Display: No

Description

Label:

円山応挙筆 松竹梅図屏風 六曲一双 紙本墨画 江戸時代

KYOTO painters

Trained in the brush techniques of Kano school painting, Maruyama Okyo established an innovative style as founder of the Kyoto-based Maruyama-Shijo school. Strong ink brushwork and dramatic compositions are combined in his work with naturalistic effects, evident here in the shading and depth of the sharply angled branches and winding screen.

Pine, bamboo, and plum trees are considered the "Three Friends of Winter" in Japan. As plants that endure winter and revive at the beginning of spring, they are considered auspicious motifs and often combined in Japanese paintings. Here the pine and bamboo are pushed to the right and left corners, as if to assert the supremacy of the plum tree, which sends out its first showy blossoms while the snow is still on the ground. Twisting tree branches project over a stream, meeting at the center.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Japanese Paintings from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", organized by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc. (Nikkei), Matsuzakaya Art Museum, Nagoya (3/2/1995-4/9/1995), Takashimaya Art Gallery, Tokyo (4/20/1995-5/9/1995), Takashimaya Grand Hall, Kyoto (6/30/1995-7/11/1995), Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama (8/2/1995-9/17/1995)
"For the New Century: Japanese Treasures from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Japan Society, New York, 3/22/2000 - 7/9/2000
Label:

円山応挙筆 松竹梅図屏風 六曲一双 紙本墨画 江戸時代

KYOTO painters

Trained in the brush techniques of Kano school painting, Maruyama Okyo established an innovative style as founder of the Kyoto-based Maruyama-Shijo school. Strong ink brushwork and dramatic compositions are combined in his work with naturalistic effects, evident here in the shading and depth of the sharply angled branches and winding screen.

Pine, bamboo, and plum trees are considered the "Three Friends of Winter" in Japan. As plants that endure winter and revive at the beginning of spring, they are considered auspicious motifs and often combined in Japanese paintings. Here the pine and bamboo are pushed to the right and left corners, as if to assert the supremacy of the plum tree, which sends out its first showy blossoms while the snow is still on the ground. Twisting tree branches project over a stream, meeting at the center.


Exhibition History: "Japanese Paintings from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", organized by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc. (Nikkei), Matsuzakaya Art Museum, Nagoya (3/2/1995-4/9/1995), Takashimaya Art Gallery, Tokyo (4/20/1995-5/9/1995), Takashimaya Grand Hall, Kyoto (6/30/1995-7/11/1995), Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama (8/2/1995-9/17/1995)
"For the New Century: Japanese Treasures from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Japan Society, New York, 3/22/2000 - 7/9/2000