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The Buddhist deity Trailokyavijaya (Gozanze Myoo)
Place of Origin: Japan
Date: 1250-1300
Historical Period: Kamakura period (1185-1333)
Object Name: Hanging scroll
Materials: Ink and colors on silk
Dimensions: H. 42 1/4 in x W. 22 1/2 in, H. 107.3 cm x W. 57.0 cm (image); H. 73 1/2 in x W. 29 in, H. 186.3 cm x W. 73.6 cm (overall)
Credit Line: Gift and Purchase from the Harry G.C. Packard Collection Charitable Trust in honor of Dr. Shujiro Shimada; The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: 1991.57
On Display: No

Description

Label:

The main figure in this painting, Gozanze Myoo (Sanskrit: Trailokyavijaya), is one of a special group of deities known as the Five Great Kings of Light. While ferocious in appearance, these kings use their powers of magical knowledge to protect believers and help them overcome obstacles to their spiritual development. Gozanze means "conqueror of the Three Worlds"; these worlds are thought to be full of craving and suffering.

Here he is depicted trampling other deities associated with the Three Worlds. Showing influences from iconographic multi-headed, multi-armed forms of Hindu deities, this Gozanze has four faces (the one in back is not visible here), each with three eyes. The front face is said to signify fury, the right one anger, the left one disgust, and the back one heroism. Gozanze's eight arms symbolize great power. His two middle hands make the gesture of anger; the three hands at his right hold a bell with thunderbolt (vajra), an arrow, and a sword; the three hands at his left carry a trident, a bow, and a lasso.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Masterpieces of Oriental Art from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Kyoto National Museum, 10/17/1995 - 11/26/1995
Label:

The main figure in this painting, Gozanze Myoo (Sanskrit: Trailokyavijaya), is one of a special group of deities known as the Five Great Kings of Light. While ferocious in appearance, these kings use their powers of magical knowledge to protect believers and help them overcome obstacles to their spiritual development. Gozanze means "conqueror of the Three Worlds"; these worlds are thought to be full of craving and suffering.

Here he is depicted trampling other deities associated with the Three Worlds. Showing influences from iconographic multi-headed, multi-armed forms of Hindu deities, this Gozanze has four faces (the one in back is not visible here), each with three eyes. The front face is said to signify fury, the right one anger, the left one disgust, and the back one heroism. Gozanze's eight arms symbolize great power. His two middle hands make the gesture of anger; the three hands at his right hold a bell with thunderbolt (vajra), an arrow, and a sword; the three hands at his left carry a trident, a bow, and a lasso.


Exhibition History: "Masterpieces of Oriental Art from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Kyoto National Museum, 10/17/1995 - 11/26/1995