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Landscape with Tao Yuanming and Lin Hejing, one of a pair
雲谷等顔筆 陶淵明・林和靖図屏風 桃山時代
Date: approx. 1573-1605
Historical Period: Momoyama period (1573-1615)
Object Name: Six panel folding screen
Materials: Ink and colors on paper
Dimensions: H. 57 7/8 in x W. 140 15/16 in, H. 147 cmx W. 358 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B60D74+
On Display: No

Description

Label: This screen depict a well-known Chinese poet in landscape settings. Tao Yuanming (365–427), seated in a hut, enjoys a drink while contemplating the chrysanthemums he loved. Gentle hills, pine trees, and bamboo surround the poets' modest dwellings. The representation in art of an ideal life of seclusion became popular in the Muromachi period (1392–1573), when, influenced by the tastes of Zen Buddhist temples, the warrior class began to appreciate the muted expressiveness of delicate ink paintings. While the samurai enjoyed lavish, glittering golden screens in their courts and castles, some of their screens and doors represented literary themes, executed in ink monochrome.

More Information

Exhibition History: "Masterpieces of Screen Painting, Including the Celebrated Japanese Paintings from the Avery Brundage Collection. An Exhibition Commemorating the 10th Anniversary of Fukui Fine Arts Museums", Fukui Fine Arts Museum, 11/14/1987 - 12/13/1987
"Japanese Paintings from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", organized by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc. (Nikkei), Matsuzakaya Art Museum, Nagoya (3/2/1995-4/9/1995), Takashimaya Art Gallery, Tokyo (4/20/1995-5/9/1995), Takashimaya Grand Hall, Kyoto (6/30/1995-7/11/1995), Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama (8/2/1995-9/17/1995)
Lords of the Samurai: The Legacy of a Daimyo Family, 6/12/2009-9/20/2009
Label: This screen depict a well-known Chinese poet in landscape settings. Tao Yuanming (365–427), seated in a hut, enjoys a drink while contemplating the chrysanthemums he loved. Gentle hills, pine trees, and bamboo surround the poets' modest dwellings. The representation in art of an ideal life of seclusion became popular in the Muromachi period (1392–1573), when, influenced by the tastes of Zen Buddhist temples, the warrior class began to appreciate the muted expressiveness of delicate ink paintings. While the samurai enjoyed lavish, glittering golden screens in their courts and castles, some of their screens and doors represented literary themes, executed in ink monochrome.
Exhibition History: "Masterpieces of Screen Painting, Including the Celebrated Japanese Paintings from the Avery Brundage Collection. An Exhibition Commemorating the 10th Anniversary of Fukui Fine Arts Museums", Fukui Fine Arts Museum, 11/14/1987 - 12/13/1987
"Japanese Paintings from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", organized by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc. (Nikkei), Matsuzakaya Art Museum, Nagoya (3/2/1995-4/9/1995), Takashimaya Art Gallery, Tokyo (4/20/1995-5/9/1995), Takashimaya Grand Hall, Kyoto (6/30/1995-7/11/1995), Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama (8/2/1995-9/17/1995)
Lords of the Samurai: The Legacy of a Daimyo Family, 6/12/2009-9/20/2009