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A Boys' Day outing
伝杉村治兵衛筆 端午子供絵
Historical Period: Edo period (1615-1868)
Object Name: Woodblock print (tan-e)
Materials: Ink with hand-applied color on paper
Dimensions: H. 23 1/2 in x W. 11 3/4 in, H. 59.7 cm x W. 29.8 cm (ō-ōban)
Credit Line: Gift of the Grabhorn Ukiyo-e Collection
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Prints And Drawings
Object Number: 2005.100.1
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Two young boys point with excitement at the colorful banners waving above a castle wall. Banners like these were flown to celebrate Boys’ Day, on the fifth day of the fifth lunar month. Japanese people today continue to celebrate this day by hoisting carp-shaped banners. One boy has a pair of toy swords tucked in his waistband, while the other rides on the shoulder of a man with a flowered robe and short hair. Their companion in the striped robe and wide obi might appear to be a woman, but is in fact an adolescent male. During their teens, young men commonly shaved their hair at the crown of the head, leaving long forelocks at the front and sides. He carries a sword at his side (the hilt is visible in front of his fan), an indication of his gender. A maid follows the entourage, sheltering the smaller boy’s head with a parasol.

 


More Information

Signature/Seal: Unsigned; no publisher's seal

Collectors’ seals: Edwin and Marjorie Grabhorn; 白爾叟 Hakujisō or Berusō?

Exhibition History: On rotation in "Designed for Pleasure: The World of Edo Japan in Prints and Paintings, 1680-1860", Asia Society, 2/25/2008 - 5/4/2008

“The Printer’s Eye: Ukiyo-e from the Grabhorn Collection”, Asian Art Museum, 2/20/15-5/10/15
Label:

Two young boys point with excitement at the colorful banners waving above a castle wall. Banners like these were flown to celebrate Boys’ Day, on the fifth day of the fifth lunar month. Japanese people today continue to celebrate this day by hoisting carp-shaped banners. One boy has a pair of toy swords tucked in his waistband, while the other rides on the shoulder of a man with a flowered robe and short hair. Their companion in the striped robe and wide obi might appear to be a woman, but is in fact an adolescent male. During their teens, young men commonly shaved their hair at the crown of the head, leaving long forelocks at the front and sides. He carries a sword at his side (the hilt is visible in front of his fan), an indication of his gender. A maid follows the entourage, sheltering the smaller boy’s head with a parasol.

 


Signature/Seal: Unsigned; no publisher's seal

Collectors’ seals: Edwin and Marjorie Grabhorn; 白爾叟 Hakujisō or Berusō?

Exhibition History: On rotation in "Designed for Pleasure: The World of Edo Japan in Prints and Paintings, 1680-1860", Asia Society, 2/25/2008 - 5/4/2008

“The Printer’s Eye: Ukiyo-e from the Grabhorn Collection”, Asian Art Museum, 2/20/15-5/10/15