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Temple hanging
Place of Origin: China
Date: approx. 1400-1450
Historical Period: Ming dynasty (1368-1644)
Materials: Silk with multicolor embroidery
Dimensions: H. 31 in x W. 68 1/8 in, H. 78.7 cm x W. 173 cm
Credit Line: Museum purchase, City Arts Trust Fund with additional funding from the Connoisseurs' Council
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Textiles
Object Number: 1990.212
On Display: No

Description

Label:

In China, as elsewhere, the lotus (hehua or lianhua) is associated with Buddhism. Flowering in the summer months, the lotus is a symbol of purity because it emerges from the muddy soil unstained. Five of the six long pendants of this hanging are embroidered with jars from which stylized versions of lotus flowers spring forth.

During the reign of the Yongle emperor (1403–1424), many Buddhist objects were made for the emperor's Buddhist practice or as gifts for the high lamas of Tibet. This hanging was probably part of the traffic of luxury goods that passed over the borders of China and Tibet at this time. Such hangings were used in temples during Buddhist rituals and special ceremonies.


Label:

In China, as elsewhere, the lotus (hehua or lianhua) is associated with Buddhism. Flowering in the summer months, the lotus is a symbol of purity because it emerges from the muddy soil unstained. Five of the six long pendants of this hanging are embroidered with jars from which stylized versions of lotus flowers spring forth.

During the reign of the Yongle emperor (1403–1424), many Buddhist objects were made for the emperor's Buddhist practice or as gifts for the high lamas of Tibet. This hanging was probably part of the traffic of luxury goods that passed over the borders of China and Tibet at this time. Such hangings were used in temples during Buddhist rituals and special ceremonies.