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The Buddha Vajrasattva
Place of Origin: Tibet
Date: 1200-1300
Materials: Bronze
Dimensions: H. 5 1/4 in x W. 4 1/4 in x D. 2 7/8 in, H. 13.4 cm x W. 10.9 cm x D. 7.4 cm
Credit Line: Gift of the Connoisseurs' Council
Department: Himalayan Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: 1990.198
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 12

Description

Label: The Buddhist deity Vajrasattva sits cross-legged on a double-lotus throne. He holds a stylized thunderbolt (vajra) to his heart and a ritual bell (ghanta) at waist level. Respectively, these two objects symbolize compassion and wisdom, the dual components of enlightenment. In Esoteric Buddhist meditation, practitioners often visualize themselves as Vajrasattva, literally the "thunderbolt being." The dynamically taught figure, elegantly executed limbs, and elaborate ornamentation show the influence of the Pala art style, which came to Tibet from eastern India in the eleventh century.
Label: The Buddhist deity Vajrasattva sits cross-legged on a double-lotus throne. He holds a stylized thunderbolt (vajra) to his heart and a ritual bell (ghanta) at waist level. Respectively, these two objects symbolize compassion and wisdom, the dual components of enlightenment. In Esoteric Buddhist meditation, practitioners often visualize themselves as Vajrasattva, literally the "thunderbolt being." The dynamically taught figure, elegantly executed limbs, and elaborate ornamentation show the influence of the Pala art style, which came to Tibet from eastern India in the eleventh century.