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Vessel (fang-zun)
Place of Origin: China
Date: approx. 1900-1949
Historical Period: Qing dynasty (1644-1911)-early Republic period (1912- )
Materials: Jadeite
Dimensions: H. 10 7/8 in x W. 6 1/8 in x D. 6 1/8 in, H. 27.7 cm x W. 15.6 cm x D. 15.6 cm
Credit Line: Transfer from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Bequest of Isabella M. Cowell
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Jade And Stones
Object Number: B68J2
On Display: No

Description

Label: The zun and the gu were used as beakers for wine in rituals from the late Neolithic period through the early Bronze Age. Due to changes in ritual practices, they were made in fewer numbers after the middle years of the Western Zhou dynasty, about 950 bce. However, their shape was popular for archaistic vases from the Song dynasty on and could be found in bronze, ceramic, lacquer, and jade from the Song through the early twentieth century. This example has the exaggerated flanges and taut profile of a bronze vessel of the early Western Zhou, and the blade motifs that decorate the flared neck and mouth can be traced back to Zhou prototypes. Its close approximation of a Bronze Age shape indicates that the artisan must have had a model to study. However, the bands that make up the main decor scheme are only loosely based on the taotie mask design of the late Shang and early Zhou dynasties and are far more fluid and curvilinear than the motifs found on archaic bronze prototypes. This decorative flourish, the high level of polish, and the close approximation of a Western Zhou bronze shape are all typical of jades of the early twentieth century.

More Information

Exhibition History: "Eternal Stone and Immortal Brush: Chinese Jades and Paintings from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Fresno Metropolitan Museum, 2/24/2002 - 6/9/2002
Later Chinese Jades: Ming Dynasty to Early Twentieth Century (Tateuchi Gallery, 11/10/2007 - 8/2008)
"The Resplendent Stone: Chinese Jades from the 18th-20th Centuries," SFO International Terminal, December 12, 2009 - June 6, 2010
Label: The zun and the gu were used as beakers for wine in rituals from the late Neolithic period through the early Bronze Age. Due to changes in ritual practices, they were made in fewer numbers after the middle years of the Western Zhou dynasty, about 950 bce. However, their shape was popular for archaistic vases from the Song dynasty on and could be found in bronze, ceramic, lacquer, and jade from the Song through the early twentieth century. This example has the exaggerated flanges and taut profile of a bronze vessel of the early Western Zhou, and the blade motifs that decorate the flared neck and mouth can be traced back to Zhou prototypes. Its close approximation of a Bronze Age shape indicates that the artisan must have had a model to study. However, the bands that make up the main decor scheme are only loosely based on the taotie mask design of the late Shang and early Zhou dynasties and are far more fluid and curvilinear than the motifs found on archaic bronze prototypes. This decorative flourish, the high level of polish, and the close approximation of a Western Zhou bronze shape are all typical of jades of the early twentieth century.
Exhibition History: "Eternal Stone and Immortal Brush: Chinese Jades and Paintings from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Fresno Metropolitan Museum, 2/24/2002 - 6/9/2002
Later Chinese Jades: Ming Dynasty to Early Twentieth Century (Tateuchi Gallery, 11/10/2007 - 8/2008)
"The Resplendent Stone: Chinese Jades from the 18th-20th Centuries," SFO International Terminal, December 12, 2009 - June 6, 2010