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Scabbard buckle (wei)
近代 和田青玉 仿漢代古劍配具璏
Place of Origin: China
Date: 1900-1940
Historical Period: Qing dynasty (1644-1911)-early Republic period
Materials: Nephrite
Dimensions: H. 3/8 in x W. 2 3/4 in x D. 3/4 in, H. .7 cm x W. 6.99 cm x D. 1.9 cm Opening height 1/4 in
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Jade And Stones
Object Number: B60J540
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Made of greenish jade, this buckle has milky opaque areas on its surface and brown areas on the top, on the back, and inside the slot, which is set off-center on the back. The long rectangular plate has two downward-curving ends. Multifaceted bosses, formed by the diagonal grooves of cross-hatching , decorate the top surface. This piece is an imitation of a Han design.

Scholars are still studying jade scabbard buckles, also known as slides, to discover exactly how they were attached to a sword and what their function was. As a group, these buckles are rectangular or elliptical plates varying in length and width. They may be plain or decorated on top with comma spirals, nipple bosses, interlocking C- or S-clouds, or dragonets (Museum of the Western Han Tomb of the King of Nanyue 1991, plate 183). The small hexagonal boss design, known as puwen (mat decor), represents a woven plant pattern. It usually decorated Han bi discs.

The surface of this piece was chemically treated to produce whitish and brown erosions that imitate the effects of time and wear. The decoration is fairly close to the mat decor (which was rare on excavated Han sword buckles), but it has been cut neatly and regularly by a modern tool.


More Information

Exhibition History: Later Chinese Jades: Ming Dynasty to Early Twentieth Century (Tateuchi Gallery, 11/10/2007 - 8/2008)
"The Resplendent Stone: Chinese Jades from the 18th-20th Centuries," SFO International Terminal, December 12, 2009 - June 6, 2010
Label:

Made of greenish jade, this buckle has milky opaque areas on its surface and brown areas on the top, on the back, and inside the slot, which is set off-center on the back. The long rectangular plate has two downward-curving ends. Multifaceted bosses, formed by the diagonal grooves of cross-hatching , decorate the top surface. This piece is an imitation of a Han design.

Scholars are still studying jade scabbard buckles, also known as slides, to discover exactly how they were attached to a sword and what their function was. As a group, these buckles are rectangular or elliptical plates varying in length and width. They may be plain or decorated on top with comma spirals, nipple bosses, interlocking C- or S-clouds, or dragonets (Museum of the Western Han Tomb of the King of Nanyue 1991, plate 183). The small hexagonal boss design, known as puwen (mat decor), represents a woven plant pattern. It usually decorated Han bi discs.

The surface of this piece was chemically treated to produce whitish and brown erosions that imitate the effects of time and wear. The decoration is fairly close to the mat decor (which was rare on excavated Han sword buckles), but it has been cut neatly and regularly by a modern tool.


Exhibition History: Later Chinese Jades: Ming Dynasty to Early Twentieth Century (Tateuchi Gallery, 11/10/2007 - 8/2008)
"The Resplendent Stone: Chinese Jades from the 18th-20th Centuries," SFO International Terminal, December 12, 2009 - June 6, 2010