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Hairpin with lingzhi fungus
Place of Origin: China
Date: approx. 1700-1800
Historical Period: Qing dynasty (1644-1911)
Object Name: hairpin
Materials: Nephrite
Dimensions: L. 5 11/16 in x W. 1 1/4 in x D. 11/16 in, L. 14.45 cm x W. 3.17 cm x D. 1.75 cm
Credit Line: Gift of R.W. Winskill in Memory of Lionel H. Pries
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Jade And Stones
Object Number: B86J3
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Made of a fine green translucent hetian jade, this pin is marked by a head shaped like a lingzhi fungus, lobed into six panels and highlighted with raised C forms around the margin. At the center, a chrysanthemum blossom circles the longevity character shou. Graceful crafting produced the elaborate raised design in such as tiny area. The top face of the stem is smoothly convex with a softly polished surface, while the reverse side is flat and plain. The bottom of the head was hollowed and connected to the stem by a small lug.

This design, with the head tilted toward the stem was developed from a traditional design showing a straight head and a long stem. From the Song period (960–1279), the heads on hairpins began increasing in size and decoration, as seen in comparisons of gold hairpins with large round heads of repoussé flowers found in Jin period (1115–1234) and Yuan period (1272–1368) tombs (Archaeology Team of Inner Mongolia 1961). Very likely originating with metal hairpins used by the northern minority in China, this design was popular in Qing hairpins, whether made of metal or jade. In the Qing imperial collection, ruyi pins were often crafted in gilt copper or gilt silver and then decorated with a ruyi head that was made of either kingfisher feathers, filigree inlaid with pearls, or jadeite (National Palace Museum, Taipei 1986,plates 126, 131, 178). A gold hairpin with an openwork ruyi head and a round longevity sign in the center was found in the inner palace in 1822 (Palace Museum, Beijing 1992, plate 113).


More Information

Exhibition History: Later Chinese Jades: Ming Dynasty to Early Twentieth Century (Tateuchi Gallery, 11/10/2007 - 8/2008)
"The Resplendent Stone: Chinese Jades from the 18th-20th Centuries," SFO International Terminal, December 12, 2009 - June 6, 2010
Label:

Made of a fine green translucent hetian jade, this pin is marked by a head shaped like a lingzhi fungus, lobed into six panels and highlighted with raised C forms around the margin. At the center, a chrysanthemum blossom circles the longevity character shou. Graceful crafting produced the elaborate raised design in such as tiny area. The top face of the stem is smoothly convex with a softly polished surface, while the reverse side is flat and plain. The bottom of the head was hollowed and connected to the stem by a small lug.

This design, with the head tilted toward the stem was developed from a traditional design showing a straight head and a long stem. From the Song period (960–1279), the heads on hairpins began increasing in size and decoration, as seen in comparisons of gold hairpins with large round heads of repoussé flowers found in Jin period (1115–1234) and Yuan period (1272–1368) tombs (Archaeology Team of Inner Mongolia 1961). Very likely originating with metal hairpins used by the northern minority in China, this design was popular in Qing hairpins, whether made of metal or jade. In the Qing imperial collection, ruyi pins were often crafted in gilt copper or gilt silver and then decorated with a ruyi head that was made of either kingfisher feathers, filigree inlaid with pearls, or jadeite (National Palace Museum, Taipei 1986,plates 126, 131, 178). A gold hairpin with an openwork ruyi head and a round longevity sign in the center was found in the inner palace in 1822 (Palace Museum, Beijing 1992, plate 113).


Exhibition History: Later Chinese Jades: Ming Dynasty to Early Twentieth Century (Tateuchi Gallery, 11/10/2007 - 8/2008)
"The Resplendent Stone: Chinese Jades from the 18th-20th Centuries," SFO International Terminal, December 12, 2009 - June 6, 2010