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Water container in the shape of a mandarin drake
Place of Origin: China
Date: 1800s
Historical Period: Qing dynasty (1644-1911)
Materials: Nephrite
Dimensions: H. 2 1/4 in x W. 3 1/4 in x D. 1 1/2 in, H. 5.7 cm x W. 8.3 cm x D. 3.8cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Jade And Stones
Object Number: B69J56
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Water containers on the scholar's table come in many forms and shapes. This well-hollowed example, made of grayish jade with light-brown suffusions, is shaped like a mandarin drake with its head turned back. The drake carries a lotus plant and waterweeds; a stalk of weed, clinging to its tail, cleverly hides a natural flaw in the stone. A lotus blossom in full bloom appears on each side of its body.

Mandarin ducks (and ducks in general) mate for life, and are the traditional symbols for wishing newlyweds a happy marriage. Among its numerous meanings, the lotus (lian) is also a pun for "continuous"— in this case, a wish for continuous birth of sons.

The tube for siphoning water, usually seen in water containers, is missing from this piece.


More Information

Exhibition History: Later Chinese Jades: Ming Dynasty to Early Twentieth Century (Tateuchi Gallery, 11/10/2007 - 8/2008)
"The Resplendent Stone: Chinese Jades from the 18th-20th Centuries," SFO International Terminal, December 12, 2009 - June 6, 2010
Label:

Water containers on the scholar's table come in many forms and shapes. This well-hollowed example, made of grayish jade with light-brown suffusions, is shaped like a mandarin drake with its head turned back. The drake carries a lotus plant and waterweeds; a stalk of weed, clinging to its tail, cleverly hides a natural flaw in the stone. A lotus blossom in full bloom appears on each side of its body.

Mandarin ducks (and ducks in general) mate for life, and are the traditional symbols for wishing newlyweds a happy marriage. Among its numerous meanings, the lotus (lian) is also a pun for "continuous"— in this case, a wish for continuous birth of sons.

The tube for siphoning water, usually seen in water containers, is missing from this piece.


Exhibition History: Later Chinese Jades: Ming Dynasty to Early Twentieth Century (Tateuchi Gallery, 11/10/2007 - 8/2008)
"The Resplendent Stone: Chinese Jades from the 18th-20th Centuries," SFO International Terminal, December 12, 2009 - June 6, 2010