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Bowl with stylized inscription
Place of Origin: Northeastern Iran
Date: approx. 900-1000
Materials: Glazed earthenware
Dimensions: H. 5 in x Diam. 13 1/2 in, H. 12.7 cm x Diam. 34.3
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: West Asian Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: B60P1857
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Bowls such as this, which scholars have called "refined and minimalist," are among the most visually powerful ceramics ever produced in the Islamic world. Made about 1000 years ago in what is now eastern Iran and the area of Samarkand in Uzbekistan, they are crafted from the simplest of materials: earthenware covered and decorated with a watery clay mixture called slip. Their inscriptions are typically Arabic proverbs or maxims.

The eastern Persian rulers under whose regime they were made fostered a highly sophisticated, multicultural society that included Persians, Arabs, Turks, and others. Of noble heritage, these rulers, the Samanids, championed older Persian artistic and literary forms while adding new Islamic elements, including the Arabic language. The inscription reads "He who is sure of his greatness is content with his powers."


More Information

Inscriptions: "He who is sure of his greatness is content with his power"
Exhibition History: "The Heritage of Islam", Houston Museum of Natural Science (3/19/1982-5/30/1982), California Academy of Sciences (7/2/1982-1/2/1983), Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute (2/26/1983-4/24/1983), National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution (6/1/1983-9/5/1983)
"Near Eastern Masterpieces", San Antonio Museum of Art, 5/16/1987 - 1/4/1988
"Ancient Middle Eastern Objects" wall case, deYoung Museum, 4/13/1988 - 4/13/1989
Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)
Label:

Bowls such as this, which scholars have called "refined and minimalist," are among the most visually powerful ceramics ever produced in the Islamic world. Made about 1000 years ago in what is now eastern Iran and the area of Samarkand in Uzbekistan, they are crafted from the simplest of materials: earthenware covered and decorated with a watery clay mixture called slip. Their inscriptions are typically Arabic proverbs or maxims.

The eastern Persian rulers under whose regime they were made fostered a highly sophisticated, multicultural society that included Persians, Arabs, Turks, and others. Of noble heritage, these rulers, the Samanids, championed older Persian artistic and literary forms while adding new Islamic elements, including the Arabic language. The inscription reads "He who is sure of his greatness is content with his powers."


Inscriptions: "He who is sure of his greatness is content with his power"
Exhibition History: "The Heritage of Islam", Houston Museum of Natural Science (3/19/1982-5/30/1982), California Academy of Sciences (7/2/1982-1/2/1983), Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute (2/26/1983-4/24/1983), National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution (6/1/1983-9/5/1983)
"Near Eastern Masterpieces", San Antonio Museum of Art, 5/16/1987 - 1/4/1988
"Ancient Middle Eastern Objects" wall case, deYoung Museum, 4/13/1988 - 4/13/1989
Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)