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Jug with gazelles and trees
Place of Origin: Iran, probably Kashan
Date: approx. 1100-1300
Materials: Glazed fritware with overglaze metallic oxide decoration
Style or Ware: Lusterware
Dimensions: H. 5 1/2 in x Diam. 5 1/2 in, H. 14 cm x Diam. 14 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: West Asian Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: B60P2000
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Gazelles prance among checkerboard trees and exuberant vines on this lusterware jug. The potter has made careful use of the jug's squat shape, drawing the baseline for the gazelles at the jug's widest point.

The glistening effect of Persian lusterware comes from the fusion of metallic oxides to the glazed surface of an object in a second kiln firing. The process to achieve luster is difficult. Lusterwares were expensive, and intended for the luxury market.

Persian lusterware appears to have been made in Kashan, a city in central Iran and an important center of the medieval ceramics industry, for a short time before and after the Mongol invasions. The small number of dated pieces discovered so far are dated between 1179 and 1198.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Near Eastern Masterpieces", San Antonio Museum of Art, 5/16/1987 - 1/4/1988
"Ancient Middle Eastern Objects" wall case (renewable annually), deYoung Museum, 4/13/1988 - 10/21/1992
Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)
Label:

Gazelles prance among checkerboard trees and exuberant vines on this lusterware jug. The potter has made careful use of the jug's squat shape, drawing the baseline for the gazelles at the jug's widest point.

The glistening effect of Persian lusterware comes from the fusion of metallic oxides to the glazed surface of an object in a second kiln firing. The process to achieve luster is difficult. Lusterwares were expensive, and intended for the luxury market.

Persian lusterware appears to have been made in Kashan, a city in central Iran and an important center of the medieval ceramics industry, for a short time before and after the Mongol invasions. The small number of dated pieces discovered so far are dated between 1179 and 1198.


Exhibition History: "Near Eastern Masterpieces", San Antonio Museum of Art, 5/16/1987 - 1/4/1988
"Ancient Middle Eastern Objects" wall case (renewable annually), deYoung Museum, 4/13/1988 - 10/21/1992
Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)