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Bowl with panel-style decoration
Place of Origin: Iran, Kashan
Date: approx. 1300-1400
Materials: Glazed fritware with underglaze decoration
Style or Ware: Sultanabad, "panel style"
Dimensions: H. 4 in x Diam. 8 3/4 in, H. 10.2 cm x Diam. 22.2 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: West Asian Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: B60P1999
On Display: No

Description

Label: This bowl is a classic example of the radiating panel style seen in fourteenth-century Persian ceramics, with its decoration organized into twelve panels of stylized leaves and arabesques, outlined and surrounded by detailed backgrounds. The exterior walls of the bowl have slightly molded indentations, hinting at a close link to the lotus petal molding of some contemporary Chinese bowls. In Persian wares, petals were often painted but not molded. The technical complexity of such ceramics lies in the careful application and control of the metallic and mineral glazes, which have different chemical properties and require different firing times and temperatures.

More Information

Exhibition History: Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)
Label: This bowl is a classic example of the radiating panel style seen in fourteenth-century Persian ceramics, with its decoration organized into twelve panels of stylized leaves and arabesques, outlined and surrounded by detailed backgrounds. The exterior walls of the bowl have slightly molded indentations, hinting at a close link to the lotus petal molding of some contemporary Chinese bowls. In Persian wares, petals were often painted but not molded. The technical complexity of such ceramics lies in the careful application and control of the metallic and mineral glazes, which have different chemical properties and require different firing times and temperatures.
Exhibition History: Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)