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Bowl with scattered trefoils
Place of Origin: Northeastern Iran
Date: approx. 900-1000
Historical Period: Samanid period (819-1005)
Materials: Slip-painted earthenware
Dimensions: H. 1 5/8 in x Diam. 5 3/8 in, H. 4.1 cm x Diam. 13.7 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: West Asian Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: B60P1989
On Display: No

Description

Label:

The most famous wares produced in the northeastern part of the Persian world in the tenth century are the large white bowls with striking designs of stylized calligraphy in dark brown, like the example on the other side of this case. The potters also reversed their colors, as here, scattering white motifs on a dark brown background.

Small dark-brown glazed bowls with decoration of scattered motifs such as this remind some scholars of Chinese Song dynasty tea bowls of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. They believe that the potters of one country may have seen and been influenced by the bowls of the other. Many scholars are cautious, however, noting differences in shape, color palette, and decorative schemes. They think that the apparent similarities could have come about by coincidence.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Near Eastern Masterpieces", San Antonio Museum of Art, 5/16/1987 - 1/4/1988
"Ancient Middle Eastern Objects" wall case, deYoung Museum, 4/13/1988 - 4/13/1989
Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)
Label:

The most famous wares produced in the northeastern part of the Persian world in the tenth century are the large white bowls with striking designs of stylized calligraphy in dark brown, like the example on the other side of this case. The potters also reversed their colors, as here, scattering white motifs on a dark brown background.

Small dark-brown glazed bowls with decoration of scattered motifs such as this remind some scholars of Chinese Song dynasty tea bowls of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. They believe that the potters of one country may have seen and been influenced by the bowls of the other. Many scholars are cautious, however, noting differences in shape, color palette, and decorative schemes. They think that the apparent similarities could have come about by coincidence.


Exhibition History: "Near Eastern Masterpieces", San Antonio Museum of Art, 5/16/1987 - 1/4/1988
"Ancient Middle Eastern Objects" wall case, deYoung Museum, 4/13/1988 - 4/13/1989
Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)