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Jug with molded decoration
Place of Origin: Iran, Kashan or Rayy
Date: approx. 1100-1200
Historical Period: Saljuq period (1038-1194)
Materials: Glazed fritware
Dimensions: H. 7 in x Diam. 5 1/2 in, H. 17.8 cm x Diam. 14 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: West Asian Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: B60P474
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Ceramic vessels from the Islamic world often imitated the shapes, and sometimes the decoration, of metal vessels. The shape of this jug, might down to its knobbed handle, is probably inspired by a metal prototype. So is the raised, molded decoration, which recalls the raised decoration created by hammering and shaping metal from the back.

The inscription boldly filling the main band of decoration is a reminder of the centrality of writing in daily life in Islamic lands. The inscription is a blessing in Arabic, "May there be Glory and Victory for you as long as the Sun [and the Moon] rise."


More Information

Inscriptions: A benedictory couplet in Arabic:
"May there be glory and Victory for you as long as the Sun [and the Moon] rise"

(Trans. Manijeh Bayani Wolpert, Nov. 2007)
Exhibition History: Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)
Label:

Ceramic vessels from the Islamic world often imitated the shapes, and sometimes the decoration, of metal vessels. The shape of this jug, might down to its knobbed handle, is probably inspired by a metal prototype. So is the raised, molded decoration, which recalls the raised decoration created by hammering and shaping metal from the back.

The inscription boldly filling the main band of decoration is a reminder of the centrality of writing in daily life in Islamic lands. The inscription is a blessing in Arabic, "May there be Glory and Victory for you as long as the Sun [and the Moon] rise."


Inscriptions: A benedictory couplet in Arabic:
"May there be glory and Victory for you as long as the Sun [and the Moon] rise"

(Trans. Manijeh Bayani Wolpert, Nov. 2007)
Exhibition History: Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)