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Vase with incised decoration
Place of Origin: Iran
Date: approx. 1150-1250
Historical Period: Saljuq period (1038-1194)
Materials: Glazed fritware
Dimensions: H. 10 in x Diam. 6 1/2 in, H. 25.4 cm x Diam. 16.5 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: West Asian Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: B60P1934
On Display: No

Description

Label: Writing plays an essential role in Islam. It is the vehicle through which the word of God is transmitted in the Koran. Calligraphers enjoyed a higher status than artists. Writing figures prominently on a wide variety of artistic mediums from arts of the book to metalwork, glass, textiles, ceramics, and architectural tile work. This vase includes an incised inscription in the kufic form of Arabic script bestowing blessings and good luck upon the vessel's owner. These inscriptions of good wishes were so fashionable on ceramics andmetalwork that even when an artisan created an illegible inscription due to illiteracy or haste the intention was still understood.
On the neck of this vessel holes were pierced through the wall of the vessel before it was glazed. When the glasslike glaze was applied it filled the holes and let light through, emphasizing the desired quality of thinness.

More Information

Exhibition History: Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)
Label: Writing plays an essential role in Islam. It is the vehicle through which the word of God is transmitted in the Koran. Calligraphers enjoyed a higher status than artists. Writing figures prominently on a wide variety of artistic mediums from arts of the book to metalwork, glass, textiles, ceramics, and architectural tile work. This vase includes an incised inscription in the kufic form of Arabic script bestowing blessings and good luck upon the vessel's owner. These inscriptions of good wishes were so fashionable on ceramics andmetalwork that even when an artisan created an illegible inscription due to illiteracy or haste the intention was still understood.
On the neck of this vessel holes were pierced through the wall of the vessel before it was glazed. When the glasslike glaze was applied it filled the holes and let light through, emphasizing the desired quality of thinness.
Exhibition History: Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)