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Jug with handle
Place of Origin: Iran, perhaps Gurgan
Date: approx. 1150-1250
Materials: Glazed fritware
Dimensions: H. 9 in x Diam. 5 1/2 in, H. 22.6 cm x Diam. 14 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: West Asian Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: B60P1927
On Display: No

Description

Label:

The dimpled surface of this jug is temptingly tactile. The new ceramic material introduced in the twelfth century, called fritware, here demonstrates its versatility. It can easily be shaped or molded to imitate other artistic mediums. The shape and honeycomb pattern of this jug copy a hammered sheet metal jug in all its details from the well-proportioned profile right down to the handle's knob. Objects in metal, an expensive and desirable material, were often imitated in ceramic and glass.

The brilliant turquoise color results from the addition of copper to the alkaline glaze covering the fritware. Monochrome turquoise wares became popular in the eleventh and twelfth centuries and turquoise has remained a signature color for Persian ceramics and architectural tiles ever since.

The jug was dipped upside down into the glaze and the base was left uncovered so that it would not stick in the kiln.


More Information

Exhibition History: Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)
"Made in China: Ming to Mass Market", USF Thacher Gallery, October 19, 2012 - December 16, 2012
Label:

The dimpled surface of this jug is temptingly tactile. The new ceramic material introduced in the twelfth century, called fritware, here demonstrates its versatility. It can easily be shaped or molded to imitate other artistic mediums. The shape and honeycomb pattern of this jug copy a hammered sheet metal jug in all its details from the well-proportioned profile right down to the handle's knob. Objects in metal, an expensive and desirable material, were often imitated in ceramic and glass.

The brilliant turquoise color results from the addition of copper to the alkaline glaze covering the fritware. Monochrome turquoise wares became popular in the eleventh and twelfth centuries and turquoise has remained a signature color for Persian ceramics and architectural tiles ever since.

The jug was dipped upside down into the glaze and the base was left uncovered so that it would not stick in the kiln.


Exhibition History: Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)
"Made in China: Ming to Mass Market", USF Thacher Gallery, October 19, 2012 - December 16, 2012