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Wall hanging with trees, peacocks, tigers, and other animals
Place of Origin: India, probably Machilipatnam, Andhra Pradesh state, made for the Persian market
Date: dated 1892-1893
Materials: Cotton
Dimensions: H. 100 1/2 in x W. 44 1/2 in, H. 255.3 cm x W. 113 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Dr. Stephen A. Sherwin and Merrill Randol Sherwin
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Textiles
Object Number: 2007.76
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Textiles of this type of manufacture are known as kalamkari ("pen-work"). The outlines and primary features of the design are printed with hand-carved blocks while the insides of the designs as well as other details are hand painted. Kalamkari textiles were popular export items for personal and domestic uses, and the market for these goods included Southeast Asia, East Asia, Persia, and Europe. The format and designs of these fabrics varied according to the market; this piece, produced for the Persian market, displays motifs that were popular in Persia: the cypress tree, flowers, and animals such as peacocks and tigers.

This textile was produced at a trading site along the southeast coast of India in the late nineteenth century, where kalamkari textiles were sold to merchants from around the world and shipped to a variety of international locations. The Muslim rulers of Golconda had established early trade connections between Machilipatnam and Persia, and one ruler in particular, Qutab Shahi, was instrumental in establishing trade with the Safavid Empire. The demand in Persia for kalamkari textiles continued into the mid-twentieth century.


More Information

Inscriptions: "From the factory of Haji Abdul Wahab, son of Haji Hameed Mulla, 1310"
Exhibition History: Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)
Label:

Textiles of this type of manufacture are known as kalamkari ("pen-work"). The outlines and primary features of the design are printed with hand-carved blocks while the insides of the designs as well as other details are hand painted. Kalamkari textiles were popular export items for personal and domestic uses, and the market for these goods included Southeast Asia, East Asia, Persia, and Europe. The format and designs of these fabrics varied according to the market; this piece, produced for the Persian market, displays motifs that were popular in Persia: the cypress tree, flowers, and animals such as peacocks and tigers.

This textile was produced at a trading site along the southeast coast of India in the late nineteenth century, where kalamkari textiles were sold to merchants from around the world and shipped to a variety of international locations. The Muslim rulers of Golconda had established early trade connections between Machilipatnam and Persia, and one ruler in particular, Qutab Shahi, was instrumental in establishing trade with the Safavid Empire. The demand in Persia for kalamkari textiles continued into the mid-twentieth century.


Inscriptions: "From the factory of Haji Abdul Wahab, son of Haji Hameed Mulla, 1310"
Exhibition History: Arts of the Islamic World from Turkey to Indonesia (Tateuchi Gallery, September 5, 2008 - March 1, 2009)