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"Crane's-neck" kettle depicting pines along a seashore
高橋敬典作  浜松地紋鶴首釜
Date: 1950-2000
Materials: Iron and bronze
Dimensions: H. 9 in x Diam. 7 1/2 in, H. 22.9 cm x W. 19.0 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Lucius H. Horiuchi in honor of Ms. Yoshiko Kakudo, Curator Emerita of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Metal Arts
Object Number: 2004.9.a-.d
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Most Japanese vessels for boiling water for tea do not have an elongated neck as this vessel does. Here the artist has lengthened and narrowed the neck to keep the hot water from cooling during winter. A low-relief pattern of pines along a seashore is delicately cast into the body, adding a subtle decorative quality to the rustic surface. The kettle has a bronze lid and two "ears" for holding ring handles.

In 1996 the Japanese government named Takahashi Keiten a Living National Treasure, or more precisely, a "Holder of Intangible Cultural Properties." In accordance with the Cultural Properties Protection Law of 1950 the government periodically designates as Living National Treasures the most accomplished artisans in various mediums. Such designation is part of the government's attempt to protect traditional craft techniques and artisanship, which might otherwise soon disappear. The artisans so designated are encouraged to transmit their skills to prospective successors.


More Information

Signature/Seal: Signature of artist near bottom of kettle and lid; yellow textile wtih artist seal.
Exhibition History: "Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions", Tateuchi Gallery, September 2, 2006 - March 25, 2007
Label:

Most Japanese vessels for boiling water for tea do not have an elongated neck as this vessel does. Here the artist has lengthened and narrowed the neck to keep the hot water from cooling during winter. A low-relief pattern of pines along a seashore is delicately cast into the body, adding a subtle decorative quality to the rustic surface. The kettle has a bronze lid and two "ears" for holding ring handles.

In 1996 the Japanese government named Takahashi Keiten a Living National Treasure, or more precisely, a "Holder of Intangible Cultural Properties." In accordance with the Cultural Properties Protection Law of 1950 the government periodically designates as Living National Treasures the most accomplished artisans in various mediums. Such designation is part of the government's attempt to protect traditional craft techniques and artisanship, which might otherwise soon disappear. The artisans so designated are encouraged to transmit their skills to prospective successors.


Signature/Seal: Signature of artist near bottom of kettle and lid; yellow textile wtih artist seal.
Exhibition History: "Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions", Tateuchi Gallery, September 2, 2006 - March 25, 2007
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