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Square sake bottle with stripes, thistles, and butterflies
Place of Origin: Japan, Saga prefecture, Arita region
Date: approx. 1690-1710
Historical Period: Edo period (1615-1868)
Materials: Imari-type Arita ware, porcelain with overglaze polychrome enamel decoration
Style or Ware: Imari ware, Arita ware
Dimensions: H. 10 1/2 in x W. 4 1/8 in x D. 4 1/8 in, H. 26.7 cm x W. 10.5 cm x D. 10.5 cm
Credit Line: Acquisition made possible in part by Yoshiko Kakudo, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson S. Bogart, Dr. and Mrs. Marvin L. Gordon, Alexandra and Dennis Lenehan, Dr. and Mrs. Vincent Fausone, Jr., Mr. George Lee, Hok Pui and Sally Yu Leung, Jean and Lindsay MacDermid, Mr. Gilson Reicken, Dr. Stephen A. Sherwin and Merrill Randol Sherwin
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Ceramics
Object Number: 2003.7
On Display: No

Description

Label:

This bottle's body is decorated with multicolored stripes, flowers, and butterflies. At one corner of the top is a chimney-like spout, and in the center is a sculptural splayed pine branch.

The vessel's square shape, unusual for a sake bottle, seems to have been inspired by Dutch glass gin bottles, imported to Nagasaki by the Dutch East India Company. Nagasaki was Japan's only port open for foreign trade during the most of the Edo period. The earliest of the Japanese porcelain versions were also square but with domed shoulders and a central spout with a cap.

This example's artisan made a square bottle with a flat top and a corner-mounted spout. The diagonal stripes on the two side panels, an unusual decorative pattern for a porcelain bottle, seem to have been inspired by kimono designs with such patterns, which were fashionable in the 1600s and 1700s, and which reflect a Japanese aesthetic inclination for diagonals. This bottle is one of a kind.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions", Tateuchi Gallery, September 2, 2006 - March 25, 2007
Label:

This bottle's body is decorated with multicolored stripes, flowers, and butterflies. At one corner of the top is a chimney-like spout, and in the center is a sculptural splayed pine branch.

The vessel's square shape, unusual for a sake bottle, seems to have been inspired by Dutch glass gin bottles, imported to Nagasaki by the Dutch East India Company. Nagasaki was Japan's only port open for foreign trade during the most of the Edo period. The earliest of the Japanese porcelain versions were also square but with domed shoulders and a central spout with a cap.

This example's artisan made a square bottle with a flat top and a corner-mounted spout. The diagonal stripes on the two side panels, an unusual decorative pattern for a porcelain bottle, seem to have been inspired by kimono designs with such patterns, which were fashionable in the 1600s and 1700s, and which reflect a Japanese aesthetic inclination for diagonals. This bottle is one of a kind.


Exhibition History: "Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions", Tateuchi Gallery, September 2, 2006 - March 25, 2007