Online Collection

Collections



Asian Art Museum Logo
Shakyamuni as an ascetic
Place of Origin: China
Date: approx. 1900-1949
Historical Period: Qing dynasty (1644-1911)-early Republic period
Materials: Nephrite
Dimensions: H. 10 1/2 in x W. 7 3/4 in x D. 7 in, H. 26.7 cm x W. 19.7 cm x D. 17.8 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Chinese Art
Collection: Jade And Stones
Object Number: B60J13
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 13

Description

Label:


近代 青綠玉 釋迦牟尼修行像


In his search for the truth, Shakyamuni, the historic Buddha, tried various methods of meditation before he finally achieved enlightenment under the bodhi tree. This piece depicts him during the time when he practiced austerities and starved himself until he was skeletal in appearance. Shakyamuni wears the simple garment of a monk, and his exposed chest reveals his ribs. His eyes are half closed and his face bears a serene expression. Because Shakyamuni is Indian, the Chinese craftworker shows him with a mustache and a ringed beard. The fasting Buddha sits in meditation with one leg bent and one leg raised, resting his chin on his hands above a raised knee.

Shakyamuni's pose and his facial features were already well established as a standard iconographical feature as early as the Yuan dynasty (1272–1368). Yet large figures such as this example were not made until the Qing dynasty, when the supply of jade became more plentiful.


More Information

Exhibition History: "The Light of Asia", Los Angeles County Museum of Art (3/1/1984-5/20/1984), The Art Institute of Chicago (6/30/1984-8/26/1984), Brooklyn Museum of Art (11/1/1984-2/10/1985)

"Chinese Jade: Stone of Immortality", Cernuschi Museum, France, 9/26/1997 - 1/4/1998

"Eternal Stone and Immortal Brush: Chinese Jades and Paintings from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Fresno Metropolitan Museum, 2/24/2002 - 6/9/2002
Label:


近代 青綠玉 釋迦牟尼修行像


In his search for the truth, Shakyamuni, the historic Buddha, tried various methods of meditation before he finally achieved enlightenment under the bodhi tree. This piece depicts him during the time when he practiced austerities and starved himself until he was skeletal in appearance. Shakyamuni wears the simple garment of a monk, and his exposed chest reveals his ribs. His eyes are half closed and his face bears a serene expression. Because Shakyamuni is Indian, the Chinese craftworker shows him with a mustache and a ringed beard. The fasting Buddha sits in meditation with one leg bent and one leg raised, resting his chin on his hands above a raised knee.

Shakyamuni's pose and his facial features were already well established as a standard iconographical feature as early as the Yuan dynasty (1272–1368). Yet large figures such as this example were not made until the Qing dynasty, when the supply of jade became more plentiful.


Exhibition History: "The Light of Asia", Los Angeles County Museum of Art (3/1/1984-5/20/1984), The Art Institute of Chicago (6/30/1984-8/26/1984), Brooklyn Museum of Art (11/1/1984-2/10/1985)

"Chinese Jade: Stone of Immortality", Cernuschi Museum, France, 9/26/1997 - 1/4/1998

"Eternal Stone and Immortal Brush: Chinese Jades and Paintings from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Fresno Metropolitan Museum, 2/24/2002 - 6/9/2002