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Sarasvati vina
Place of Origin: Southern India
Date: 1800-1850
Materials: Rosewood, gilded copper and modern gut strings
Dimensions: H. 10 in x L. 45 in
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Musical Instruments
Object Number: B62M67
On Display: No

Description

Label:

The Sarasvati vina is named for the Hindu goddess revered as the patron of all arts, particularly music. The close association of the vina with the goddess—who is also the embodiment of wisdom and learning—is reflected in the belief that to master this instrument is a form of esoteric knowledge and, thus, a path to the divine.

Historically, the term vina was applied to South Asian plucked-string instruments in general. Today the term is normally understood to refer to the type of long-necked southern Indian instrument represented here. The large bulbous end of the vina is the primary sound resonator. A smaller secondary resonator—lacking in this example—is often attached along the neck, and it serves primarily as a rest while the instrument is held across the body and played. As with many other vinas, this example features a neck whose end is carved in the form of a mythical lion's head.


More Information

Exhibition History: Thematic exhibition "Shadows, Masks, and Music: Aspects of the Performing Arts in Asia" at AAM 4/23/05-1/22/06
Label:

The Sarasvati vina is named for the Hindu goddess revered as the patron of all arts, particularly music. The close association of the vina with the goddess—who is also the embodiment of wisdom and learning—is reflected in the belief that to master this instrument is a form of esoteric knowledge and, thus, a path to the divine.

Historically, the term vina was applied to South Asian plucked-string instruments in general. Today the term is normally understood to refer to the type of long-necked southern Indian instrument represented here. The large bulbous end of the vina is the primary sound resonator. A smaller secondary resonator—lacking in this example—is often attached along the neck, and it serves primarily as a rest while the instrument is held across the body and played. As with many other vinas, this example features a neck whose end is carved in the form of a mythical lion's head.


Exhibition History: Thematic exhibition "Shadows, Masks, and Music: Aspects of the Performing Arts in Asia" at AAM 4/23/05-1/22/06