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Long horn
Place of Origin: Tibet
Date: approx. 1700-1800
Materials: Gilded silver
Dimensions: L. 74 1/2 in x W. 5 3/4 in x D. 7 in, L. 189.2 cm x W. 14.6 cm x D. 17.8 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Himalayan Art
Collection: Musical Instruments
Object Number: B60M160.a-.b
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Used during prayers and dances as well as for welcoming important guests, long horns (dung-chen) produce the bass (low) tones in Tibetan ritual music. The sound of the long horn is said to resemble the voice of the legendary six-tusked white elephant associated with the coming of a Buddha into the world. Long horns come in pairs, and the two horns are played at slightly different pitches, emulating the sounds of the bull elephant calling to his mate and of her answering voice, which is a little higher in pitch.

The horns are usually accompanied by large bronze cymbals and bass drums. When played in a temple, they rest on stands. During processions, acolytes carry the horns by a rope handle attached to the larger end.

Long horns are made in sections and are reinforced by collars with engraved designs. They are similar to the alpine horns of Switzerland but are collapsible for storage and transport.


More Information

Exhibition History: Thematic exhibition "Shadows, Masks, and Music: Aspects of the Performing Arts in Asia" at AAM 4/23/05-1/22/06
Label:

Used during prayers and dances as well as for welcoming important guests, long horns (dung-chen) produce the bass (low) tones in Tibetan ritual music. The sound of the long horn is said to resemble the voice of the legendary six-tusked white elephant associated with the coming of a Buddha into the world. Long horns come in pairs, and the two horns are played at slightly different pitches, emulating the sounds of the bull elephant calling to his mate and of her answering voice, which is a little higher in pitch.

The horns are usually accompanied by large bronze cymbals and bass drums. When played in a temple, they rest on stands. During processions, acolytes carry the horns by a rope handle attached to the larger end.

Long horns are made in sections and are reinforced by collars with engraved designs. They are similar to the alpine horns of Switzerland but are collapsible for storage and transport.


Exhibition History: Thematic exhibition "Shadows, Masks, and Music: Aspects of the Performing Arts in Asia" at AAM 4/23/05-1/22/06