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A procession beneath the ancient palace of Man Singh at Gwalior
Date: approx. 1886-1893
Materials: Charcoal and chalk on paper
Dimensions: Framed (original frame): H. 32 1/4 × W. 36 in. (81.9 × 91.4 cm) Image: H. 17 5/8 × W. 21 1/2 in. (44.8 × 54.6 cm)
Credit Line: From the Collection of William K. Ehrenfeld, M.D.
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Prints And Drawings
Object Number: 2005.64.115
On Display: No

Description

Label:

India's elephants, in addition to its architectural monuments and the customs of its people, attracted the attention of Western travelers. Many seem to have been greatly fascinated by elephant processions, and included descriptions of such events in words and/or illustrations in their published travel journals and memoirs.

In 1896, the successful American artist Edwin Lord Weeks described the city of Gwalior and its famous fifteenth-century palace in his travel journal, in a manner similar to Captain Mundy in 1832. Both writers speak of the palace atop a rocky ridge that arose from the extensive arid plain below. In this unpublished sketch, Weeks shows a winding procession led by several elephants,horsemen, and attendants on foot, on a narrow curving path along the steep ridge. A glimpse of the palace appears in the upper right corner.


More Information

Inscriptions: Signed and inscribed in lower left corner: "To my friend / Scinnary [?] Natchill [?] / E.L. Weeks."
Exhibition History: "Interaction of Cultures: Indian and Western Painting, 1780-1910", deYoung Museum, San Francisco. (February 7 - May 3, 1998)

"Elephants on Parade", 2/18/2006 - 8/6/2006, Tateuchi Gallery

"Elephants Without Number", Asian Art Museum, 11/24/2015-6/26/2016
Label:

India's elephants, in addition to its architectural monuments and the customs of its people, attracted the attention of Western travelers. Many seem to have been greatly fascinated by elephant processions, and included descriptions of such events in words and/or illustrations in their published travel journals and memoirs.

In 1896, the successful American artist Edwin Lord Weeks described the city of Gwalior and its famous fifteenth-century palace in his travel journal, in a manner similar to Captain Mundy in 1832. Both writers speak of the palace atop a rocky ridge that arose from the extensive arid plain below. In this unpublished sketch, Weeks shows a winding procession led by several elephants,horsemen, and attendants on foot, on a narrow curving path along the steep ridge. A glimpse of the palace appears in the upper right corner.


Inscriptions: Signed and inscribed in lower left corner: "To my friend / Scinnary [?] Natchill [?] / E.L. Weeks."
Exhibition History: "Interaction of Cultures: Indian and Western Painting, 1780-1910", deYoung Museum, San Francisco. (February 7 - May 3, 1998)

"Elephants on Parade", 2/18/2006 - 8/6/2006, Tateuchi Gallery

"Elephants Without Number", Asian Art Museum, 11/24/2015-6/26/2016