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Mahratta Chief and Horseman; Gwalior in the Distance
Landseer's Etchings for Mundy's Travels in India
Date: 1832
Materials: Unbound etching in cloth-bound portfolio ((Chine-colle)
Dimensions: H. 4 in x W. 6 1/2 in, H. 10.2 cm x W. 16.5 cm (image)
Credit Line: From the Collection of William K. Ehrenfeld, M.D.
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Prints And Drawings
Object Number: 2005.64.367.13
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Mundy's admiration for elephants is expressed repeatedly in his journal entries and conveyed in the occasional accompanying illustrations. On January 3, 1829, he described the Maharaja of Gwalior's royal elephant as ''the most beautiful animal I ever saw": its head and trunk were painted in rich colors; it was dressed with luxurious textiles (gold- and silver-embroidered velvet), and wore elaborate silver ornaments on its tusks,ears, and feet.

Mundy compared the Indian imperial elephants he saw with English thoroughbred horses, and the elephants of English officers in India with workhorses. "The [English East India] Company's elephants ...shuffle along with short steps,their necks bent, and their heads hanging with the melancholy air of an Oxford-street hackney coach-horse. The Mahratta [sic] elephant strides majestically along,his head elevated far above his shoulder, and his tusks standing out horizontally [as seen in this print]. The chiefs pride themselves greatly upon these animals."


More Information

Exhibition History: "Elephants Without Number", Asian Art Museum, 11/24/2015-6/26/2016
Label:

Mundy's admiration for elephants is expressed repeatedly in his journal entries and conveyed in the occasional accompanying illustrations. On January 3, 1829, he described the Maharaja of Gwalior's royal elephant as ''the most beautiful animal I ever saw": its head and trunk were painted in rich colors; it was dressed with luxurious textiles (gold- and silver-embroidered velvet), and wore elaborate silver ornaments on its tusks,ears, and feet.

Mundy compared the Indian imperial elephants he saw with English thoroughbred horses, and the elephants of English officers in India with workhorses. "The [English East India] Company's elephants ...shuffle along with short steps,their necks bent, and their heads hanging with the melancholy air of an Oxford-street hackney coach-horse. The Mahratta [sic] elephant strides majestically along,his head elevated far above his shoulder, and his tusks standing out horizontally [as seen in this print]. The chiefs pride themselves greatly upon these animals."


Exhibition History: "Elephants Without Number", Asian Art Museum, 11/24/2015-6/26/2016