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The Hindu deity Ganesha
Place of Origin: India, Tamil Nadu state
Date: approx. 1400-1600
Materials: Bronze
Dimensions: H. 25 3/4 in x W. 20 in x D. 9 1/2 in, H. 65.4 cm x W. 50.8 cm x D. 24.1 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B64B18
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 4

Description

Label: The amiable, elephant-headed Ganesha is a son, as is Skanda, of Shiva and Parvati. Ganesha here holds several of his most important symbolic implements. In his lower left hand is the dish of sweets from which he loves to feed. In the lower right is a piece of his own tusk. He is said to have broken it off to use as a stylus for copying down the great epic Mahabharata when its author first recited it.

More Information

Exhibition History: "Ganesha: The Elephant-Headed God", Philbrook Museum of Art, 4/10/1988 - 5/15/1988
"Ganesha: The Elephant-Headed God", Asian Art Museum, 11/15/1986 - 3/1/1987
Label: The amiable, elephant-headed Ganesha is a son, as is Skanda, of Shiva and Parvati. Ganesha here holds several of his most important symbolic implements. In his lower left hand is the dish of sweets from which he loves to feed. In the lower right is a piece of his own tusk. He is said to have broken it off to use as a stylus for copying down the great epic Mahabharata when its author first recited it.
Exhibition History: "Ganesha: The Elephant-Headed God", Philbrook Museum of Art, 4/10/1988 - 5/15/1988
"Ganesha: The Elephant-Headed God", Asian Art Museum, 11/15/1986 - 3/1/1987