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The Conception of the Buddha-to-be in Queen Maya's dream
Place of Origin: Pakistan, ancient region of Gandhara
Date: approx. 100-300
Object Name: frieze
Materials: Phyllite
Dimensions: H. 10 in x W. 11 in x D. 2 in, H. 25.4 cm x W. 28 cm x D. 5.1 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B64S5
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 1

Description

Label:

The seven relief sculptures you see here, all about 1,800 years old, were made in the ancient region of Gandhara in what is now Pakistan. They came from different sites and do not form a set. Many scenes from the Buddha's life were depicted in early Buddhist art, and in the group shown here a number of scenes are missing. Nevertheless, this group of reliefs, together with their labels (which quote ancient retellings of the Buddha's life story), gives a hint of how that story was understood by early Buddhists.

"And lying down on the royal couch, Queen Maya fell asleep and dreamed the following dream: Four guardian angels came and lifted her up, together with her couch, and took her away to the Himalaya Mountains. . . . Now the Buddha-to-be had become a superb white elephant and was wandering about at no great distance. . . . And three times he walked round his mother's couch, with his right side towards it, and striking her on her right side, he seemed to enter her womb. Thus the conception took place in the Midsummer Festival." (Adapted from Henry Clark Warren's 1896 translation of an ancient Buddhist text)


More Information

Exhibition History: "Indian and South-East Asian Stone Sculptures from the Avery Brundage Collection", Pasadena Art Museum 11/22/1969-2/1/1970, The Miami Art Center 2/26/1970-4/15/1970, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts 5/6/1970-6/21/1970, Joslyn Art Museum 7/7/1970-10/15/1970, Lakeview Center for the Arts and Sciences 11/1/1970-12/31/1970

"The Light of Asia", Los Angeles County Museum of Art (3/1/1984-5/20/1984), The Art Institute of Chicago (6/30/1984-8/26/1984), Brooklyn Museum of Art (11/1/1984-2/10/1985)

"The Image of Women in Indian Art", Antonio Prieto Memorial Gallery, Mills College, 9/16/1985 - 11/15/1985

"GENERATIONS", Smithsonian's International Center, 9/11/1987 - 3/31/1988
Label:

The seven relief sculptures you see here, all about 1,800 years old, were made in the ancient region of Gandhara in what is now Pakistan. They came from different sites and do not form a set. Many scenes from the Buddha's life were depicted in early Buddhist art, and in the group shown here a number of scenes are missing. Nevertheless, this group of reliefs, together with their labels (which quote ancient retellings of the Buddha's life story), gives a hint of how that story was understood by early Buddhists.

"And lying down on the royal couch, Queen Maya fell asleep and dreamed the following dream: Four guardian angels came and lifted her up, together with her couch, and took her away to the Himalaya Mountains. . . . Now the Buddha-to-be had become a superb white elephant and was wandering about at no great distance. . . . And three times he walked round his mother's couch, with his right side towards it, and striking her on her right side, he seemed to enter her womb. Thus the conception took place in the Midsummer Festival." (Adapted from Henry Clark Warren's 1896 translation of an ancient Buddhist text)


Exhibition History: "Indian and South-East Asian Stone Sculptures from the Avery Brundage Collection", Pasadena Art Museum 11/22/1969-2/1/1970, The Miami Art Center 2/26/1970-4/15/1970, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts 5/6/1970-6/21/1970, Joslyn Art Museum 7/7/1970-10/15/1970, Lakeview Center for the Arts and Sciences 11/1/1970-12/31/1970

"The Light of Asia", Los Angeles County Museum of Art (3/1/1984-5/20/1984), The Art Institute of Chicago (6/30/1984-8/26/1984), Brooklyn Museum of Art (11/1/1984-2/10/1985)

"The Image of Women in Indian Art", Antonio Prieto Memorial Gallery, Mills College, 9/16/1985 - 11/15/1985

"GENERATIONS", Smithsonian's International Center, 9/11/1987 - 3/31/1988