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The Three Protectors of Tibet
Date: 2008
Object Name: Thangka
Materials: Ink and colors on cotton
Dimensions: Overall: H. 36 3/4 in × W. 43 1/2 in, H. 93.3 cm × W. 110.5 cm; Image: H. 17 3/4 × W. 38 5/8 in, H. 45.1 cm × W. 98.1 cm
Credit Line: Acquisition made possible by the Tibetan Study Group
Department: Himalayan Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: 2016.305
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Bay Area artist Tsherin Sherpa, a master of thangka painting, has placed three  of Tibet's most important religious figures within a series of marvelously detailed shrine spaces based on the ancient  tradition of the Ngor monastery. Collectively known as the Three Protectors  of Tibet, they are among the greatest  of bodhisattvas-beings who vow not to enter the bliss of nirvana until they have saved all other  beings from the endless round of suffering called samsara.

On the left  is yellow Manjushri, the bodhisattva of wisdom (prajna). He brandishes the sword of wisdom  in his right hand. Above his left  shoulder, a book rests on a lotus.

In the center sits Avalokiteshvara, bodhisattva of compassion (karuna). He holds a garland of meditation beads in his upper right hand; his special mantra, which the meditation garland symbolizes, is "the jewel is in the lotus" (om mani  padme hum).

On the right is blue Vajrapani, who embodies  the power (shakti) of the Buddha. Although he becomes important only in the later Buddhist texts called Tantras, Vajrapani is nonetheless among the first bodhisattvas to appear  in the art historicaI record.


Label:

Bay Area artist Tsherin Sherpa, a master of thangka painting, has placed three  of Tibet's most important religious figures within a series of marvelously detailed shrine spaces based on the ancient  tradition of the Ngor monastery. Collectively known as the Three Protectors  of Tibet, they are among the greatest  of bodhisattvas-beings who vow not to enter the bliss of nirvana until they have saved all other  beings from the endless round of suffering called samsara.

On the left  is yellow Manjushri, the bodhisattva of wisdom (prajna). He brandishes the sword of wisdom  in his right hand. Above his left  shoulder, a book rests on a lotus.

In the center sits Avalokiteshvara, bodhisattva of compassion (karuna). He holds a garland of meditation beads in his upper right hand; his special mantra, which the meditation garland symbolizes, is "the jewel is in the lotus" (om mani  padme hum).

On the right is blue Vajrapani, who embodies  the power (shakti) of the Buddha. Although he becomes important only in the later Buddhist texts called Tantras, Vajrapani is nonetheless among the first bodhisattvas to appear  in the art historicaI record.