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The heroic man-bird Garuda
Place of Origin: Bangladesh or India, West Bengal state
Date: approx. 900-1100
Materials: Stone (hornfels)
Style or Ware: Pala
Dimensions: H. 17 in x W. 11 in x D. 6 in
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B62S44+
On Display: No

Description

Label: Garuda is a mythical creature with the body of a man and the wings, beak, and talons of a bird. Garuda is associated with the sun's rays and is known for his power to destroy serpents, including the two giant snakes guarding the storm god Indra's amrita, the divine nectar that confers immortality. Garuda is typically depicted adorned with eight snakes and with hands folded in supplication. Garuda's image carved on pillars at the front of early temples indicate his connection with Vishnu, for whom he serves as a vehicle in ancient religious texts.

More Information

Exhibition History: "The Indian Pantheon: Sculpture of India and Southeast Asia", University Art Museum, Berkeley, 1/27/1979 - 4/1/1979
"Hindu Deities", San Francisco International Airport, United Terminal, August 10, 2012 - March 4, 2013
Label: Garuda is a mythical creature with the body of a man and the wings, beak, and talons of a bird. Garuda is associated with the sun's rays and is known for his power to destroy serpents, including the two giant snakes guarding the storm god Indra's amrita, the divine nectar that confers immortality. Garuda is typically depicted adorned with eight snakes and with hands folded in supplication. Garuda's image carved on pillars at the front of early temples indicate his connection with Vishnu, for whom he serves as a vehicle in ancient religious texts.
Exhibition History: "The Indian Pantheon: Sculpture of India and Southeast Asia", University Art Museum, Berkeley, 1/27/1979 - 4/1/1979
"Hindu Deities", San Francisco International Airport, United Terminal, August 10, 2012 - March 4, 2013