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A female deity, perhaps Devasena
Place of Origin: Southern India
Date: 1700-1800
Materials: Stone (gabbro)
Dimensions: H. 29 1/2 in x W. 9 3/4 in x D. 5 1/2 in, H. 74.9 cm x W. 24.8 cm x D. 14.0 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B61S11+
On Display: No

Description

Label: This image was made in a village tradition that did not conform closely to the widely established rules of style or iconography. Because of the image's rural context, it remains difficult to know exactly how it was used or which goddess it represents; a likely guess is Devasena, the daughter of the kings of the gods Indra. Devasena was a consort of Skanda, a popular deity among Tamil Hindus in South India, among whom he is often called Murugan.

More Information

Exhibition History: "Hindu Deities", San Francisco International Airport, United Terminal, August 10, 2012 - March 4, 2013
Label: This image was made in a village tradition that did not conform closely to the widely established rules of style or iconography. Because of the image's rural context, it remains difficult to know exactly how it was used or which goddess it represents; a likely guess is Devasena, the daughter of the kings of the gods Indra. Devasena was a consort of Skanda, a popular deity among Tamil Hindus in South India, among whom he is often called Murugan.
Exhibition History: "Hindu Deities", San Francisco International Airport, United Terminal, August 10, 2012 - March 4, 2013