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The Hindu deity Surya flanked by Pingala and Danda
Place of Origin: India, Bihar state
Date: approx. 600-700
Materials: Limestone
Dimensions: H. 39 1/2 in x W. 18 in x D. 8 in, H. 100.3 cm x W. 45.7 cm x D. 20.3 cm
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Sculpture
Object Number: B63S36+
On Display: No

Description

Label: The deity Surya is associated with the skies, and particularly with the sun. Here he holds the stems of two large lotus flowers that radiate brightness. His sashes flutter at his sides as if blown by the wind. Standing to one side of Surya is his bearded scribe, who carries a pen and inkpot. On the other side is an attendant holding a staff. His name, Danda, means "staff." Scholars link the origins of the deity Surya with the far western parts of the Indian world near Iran, where solar deities were prominent. Even images made in other parts of India, such as this, wear the long robes and boots linked with traditional Iranian dress. (Here the robe clings to the contours of the body, but its lower border can be seen along the lower legs.)

More Information

Exhibition History: "Indian and South-East Asian Stone Sculptures from the Avery Brundage Collection", Pasadena Art Museum 11/22/1969-2/1/1970, The Miami Art Center 2/26/1970-4/15/1970, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts 5/6/1970-6/21/1970, Joslyn Art Museum 7/7/1970-10/15/1970, Lakeview Center for the Arts and Sciences 11/1/1970-12/31/1970.

"The Indian Pantheon: Sculpture of India and Southeast Asia", University Art Museum, Berkeley, 1/27/1979 - 4/1/1979

"Hindu Deities", San Francisco International Airport, United Terminal, August 10, 2012 - March 4, 2013

"Flower Power", Asian Art Museum, 6/23/2017-10/1/2017
Label: The deity Surya is associated with the skies, and particularly with the sun. Here he holds the stems of two large lotus flowers that radiate brightness. His sashes flutter at his sides as if blown by the wind. Standing to one side of Surya is his bearded scribe, who carries a pen and inkpot. On the other side is an attendant holding a staff. His name, Danda, means "staff." Scholars link the origins of the deity Surya with the far western parts of the Indian world near Iran, where solar deities were prominent. Even images made in other parts of India, such as this, wear the long robes and boots linked with traditional Iranian dress. (Here the robe clings to the contours of the body, but its lower border can be seen along the lower legs.)
Exhibition History: "Indian and South-East Asian Stone Sculptures from the Avery Brundage Collection", Pasadena Art Museum 11/22/1969-2/1/1970, The Miami Art Center 2/26/1970-4/15/1970, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts 5/6/1970-6/21/1970, Joslyn Art Museum 7/7/1970-10/15/1970, Lakeview Center for the Arts and Sciences 11/1/1970-12/31/1970.

"The Indian Pantheon: Sculpture of India and Southeast Asia", University Art Museum, Berkeley, 1/27/1979 - 4/1/1979

"Hindu Deities", San Francisco International Airport, United Terminal, August 10, 2012 - March 4, 2013

"Flower Power", Asian Art Museum, 6/23/2017-10/1/2017