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Playing Qin Under Pine Trees
浦上玉堂筆 「松下撫琴」 江戸時代
Date: 1745-1820
Historical Period: Edo period (1615-1868)
Object Name: Hanging scroll
Materials: Ink and colors on paper
Dimensions: H. 11 1/4 in x W. 9 1/4 in, H. 28.6 cm x W. 23.5 cm (image); H. 49 1/2 in x W. 17 1/8 in, H. 125.8 cm x W. 43.5 cm image. 11 1/4 in x 9 1/4 in
Credit Line: Transfer from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Gift of Ney-Wolfskill Fund
Department: Japanese Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B69D49
On Display: No

Description

Label:

The title of this landscape refers to a qin (Chinese zither) player under a pine tree, possibly the painter's own image in an ideal setting. Born the son of a middle-ranking samurai, Uragami Gyokudo studied Confucianism and Chinese literature in a school for samurai children. Gyokudo began to study the seven-string qin, the instrument associated with Chinese scholars, while in his early thirties. At the age of forty-nine, he resigned his position as the head of his clan and took up a life of wandering,composing and performing music, and painting.

Almost lost in the vast mountain scenery, the musician sits under a large branch that spreads to the right. Long,dry brushstrokes contour the peaks and boulders, while short repeated strokes delineate the pine needles,shrubs, and grasses. Full of bulging and leaning forms,the landscape pulses with energy-setting it apart from the still scenery of fellow literati Nakabayashi Chikuto and Yamamoto Baiitsu.


More Information

Marks: The signature "Gyokudo"; two seals: the square relief sel "Kinshi," and the square intaglio seal "Hakusen Kinshi"
Exhibition History: "Japanese Paintings from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", organized by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc. (Nikkei), Matsuzakaya Art Museum, Nagoya (3/2/1995-4/9/1995), Takashimaya Art Gallery, Tokyo (4/20/1995-5/9/1995), Takashimaya Grand Hall, Kyoto (6/30/1995-7/11/1995), Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama (8/2/1995-9/17/1995)
"For the New Century: Japanese Treasures from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Japan Society, New York, 3/22/2000 - 7/9/2000
Label:

The title of this landscape refers to a qin (Chinese zither) player under a pine tree, possibly the painter's own image in an ideal setting. Born the son of a middle-ranking samurai, Uragami Gyokudo studied Confucianism and Chinese literature in a school for samurai children. Gyokudo began to study the seven-string qin, the instrument associated with Chinese scholars, while in his early thirties. At the age of forty-nine, he resigned his position as the head of his clan and took up a life of wandering,composing and performing music, and painting.

Almost lost in the vast mountain scenery, the musician sits under a large branch that spreads to the right. Long,dry brushstrokes contour the peaks and boulders, while short repeated strokes delineate the pine needles,shrubs, and grasses. Full of bulging and leaning forms,the landscape pulses with energy-setting it apart from the still scenery of fellow literati Nakabayashi Chikuto and Yamamoto Baiitsu.


Marks: The signature "Gyokudo"; two seals: the square relief sel "Kinshi," and the square intaglio seal "Hakusen Kinshi"
Exhibition History: "Japanese Paintings from the Collection of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", organized by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc. (Nikkei), Matsuzakaya Art Museum, Nagoya (3/2/1995-4/9/1995), Takashimaya Art Gallery, Tokyo (4/20/1995-5/9/1995), Takashimaya Grand Hall, Kyoto (6/30/1995-7/11/1995), Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama (8/2/1995-9/17/1995)
"For the New Century: Japanese Treasures from the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco", Japan Society, New York, 3/22/2000 - 7/9/2000