Online Collection

Collections



Asian Art Museum Logo
Wrapping cloth (bojagi)
Place of Origin: Korea
Date: 1950-1960
Materials: Patchwork silk
Dimensions: H. 40 1/8 n x W. 40 1/8 in, H. 102 cm x W. 102 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Mrs. Ann Witter
Department: Korean Art
Collection: Textiles
Object Number: 1998.57
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Wrapping cloths were an integral part of daily life in Korea. They were used to cover serving tables or trays, to wrap precious objects, and to carry objects small and large. The tab in the center was attached to the cloth with bat-shaped knobs, bats being a symbol of good luck in traditional Korean culture.

Probably made by a woman from scraps, this cloth juxtaposes various geometric shapes of vibrant colors to create a dynamic design. Long before modern abstract painters like Piet Mondrian (1872–1944) were creating their geometric compositions, Korean women were experimenting with such shapes and colors in their wrapping cloth designs.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Gorgeous", Asian Art Museum, 6/20/2014 - 9/14/2014
Additional Label:

The design of this artwork is far less random than it seems at first. Colored elements get bigger systematically from the center toward the edges, suggesting a radiation (or explosion) outward. Then, bands of one pattern appear to be laid over another pattern. Underneath there are angled shards of yellow and navy. On top lie horizontal bands striped in whites, reds, blues, and greens. In fact, the artist did not make one pattern and then lay bands over it. The effect was created by careful conceptual planning from the beginning.

Artists in many mediums interleave unrelated patterns (or styles, or narrative lines). In novels and films authors and directors may present alternating slices of various narratives, set in different times and places, as in The Hours or Cloud Atlas. In architecture, think of the interior of the Asian Art Museum: architect Gae Aulenti juxtaposed areas of sleek Milanese modernism with dignified Beaux-Arts classicism.

- FMcG ("Gorgeous" exhibition)


Label:

Wrapping cloths were an integral part of daily life in Korea. They were used to cover serving tables or trays, to wrap precious objects, and to carry objects small and large. The tab in the center was attached to the cloth with bat-shaped knobs, bats being a symbol of good luck in traditional Korean culture.

Probably made by a woman from scraps, this cloth juxtaposes various geometric shapes of vibrant colors to create a dynamic design. Long before modern abstract painters like Piet Mondrian (1872–1944) were creating their geometric compositions, Korean women were experimenting with such shapes and colors in their wrapping cloth designs.


Exhibition History: "Gorgeous", Asian Art Museum, 6/20/2014 - 9/14/2014
Expanded Label:

The design of this artwork is far less random than it seems at first. Colored elements get bigger systematically from the center toward the edges, suggesting a radiation (or explosion) outward. Then, bands of one pattern appear to be laid over another pattern. Underneath there are angled shards of yellow and navy. On top lie horizontal bands striped in whites, reds, blues, and greens. In fact, the artist did not make one pattern and then lay bands over it. The effect was created by careful conceptual planning from the beginning.

Artists in many mediums interleave unrelated patterns (or styles, or narrative lines). In novels and films authors and directors may present alternating slices of various narratives, set in different times and places, as in The Hours or Cloud Atlas. In architecture, think of the interior of the Asian Art Museum: architect Gae Aulenti juxtaposed areas of sleek Milanese modernism with dignified Beaux-Arts classicism.

- FMcG ("Gorgeous" exhibition)