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Dragon, phoenix, deer, tiger, crane, and peonies
길상 무늬 병풍
Place of Origin: Korea
Date: 1850-1950
Historical Period: Joseon dynasty (1392-1910) or Japanese colonial period (1910–1945)
Object Name: Six panel folding screen
Materials: Lacquered wood with inlaid mother-of-pearl, tortoiseshell, brass wire, and ray skin
Dimensions: H. 35 3/4 in x W. 14 1/4 in Each panel
Credit Line: The Avery Brundage Collection
Department: Korean Art
Collection: Decorative Arts
Object Number: B61D13
On Display: No

Description

Label:

This six-panel folding screen is rare. The inlay is a combination of mother-of-pearl, tortoiseshell, and ray skin. This combination was common in lacquerwares during the late nineteenth to early twentieth century. Each screen features a motif that is deeply symbolic in traditional Korean art. From right to left, a dragon, phoenix, deer, tiger, crane, and peonies are depicted. The order and combination are not conventional, which suggests that these panels might have been taken from a larger set of screens.

Conservation of this work is made possible by the Overseas Korean Cultural Heritage Foundation.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Mother-of-Pearl Lacquerware from Korea", Asian Art Museum (04/29/16 - 10/23/16)
Label:

This six-panel folding screen is rare. The inlay is a combination of mother-of-pearl, tortoiseshell, and ray skin. This combination was common in lacquerwares during the late nineteenth to early twentieth century. Each screen features a motif that is deeply symbolic in traditional Korean art. From right to left, a dragon, phoenix, deer, tiger, crane, and peonies are depicted. The order and combination are not conventional, which suggests that these panels might have been taken from a larger set of screens.

Conservation of this work is made possible by the Overseas Korean Cultural Heritage Foundation.


Exhibition History: "Mother-of-Pearl Lacquerware from Korea", Asian Art Museum (04/29/16 - 10/23/16)