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Cambodian dancers portraying Hanuman and a lady, characters from the Cambodian version of the Ramayana
Date: 1934
Object Name: Lithograph
Materials: Lithograph, ink on paper
Dimensions: H. 13 3/4 in x W. 9 1/4 in, H. 34.9 cm x W. 23. 5 cm
Credit Line: Museum purchase
Department: Southeast Asian Art
Collection: Prints And Drawings
Object Number: 2014.44
On Display: No

More Information

Signature/Seal: Signed in pencil
Inscriptions: inscribed "ed. 40-31"
Exhibition History: "The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe," Asian Art Museum, October 21, 2015–January 15, 2017
Additional Label:

American and European artists have sometimes portrayed Hanuman and other characters of the Rama epic. This American lithograph shows the characters of Hanuman and a lady from a Cambodian dance-drama of the Rama epic. In South Asia Hanuman is portrayed as being completely devoted to Rama; in Southeast Asia, though, he romantically pursues several female characters.

When this lithograph was reproduced in a magazine in 1934 it was described as being based on the artist Thomas Handforth’s observations of dancers at the famous Cambodian monument of Angkor Wat. Photographs from the first few decades of the 1900s record performances by the royal dance troupe at the temple and it is likely Handforth saw them there when he visited.

(Exhibition Label from The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe)


Signature/Seal: Signed in pencil
Inscriptions: inscribed "ed. 40-31"
Exhibition History: "The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe," Asian Art Museum, October 21, 2015–January 15, 2017
Expanded Label:

American and European artists have sometimes portrayed Hanuman and other characters of the Rama epic. This American lithograph shows the characters of Hanuman and a lady from a Cambodian dance-drama of the Rama epic. In South Asia Hanuman is portrayed as being completely devoted to Rama; in Southeast Asia, though, he romantically pursues several female characters.

When this lithograph was reproduced in a magazine in 1934 it was described as being based on the artist Thomas Handforth’s observations of dancers at the famous Cambodian monument of Angkor Wat. Photographs from the first few decades of the 1900s record performances by the royal dance troupe at the temple and it is likely Handforth saw them there when he visited.

(Exhibition Label from The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe)