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After conservation treatment
Standing Buddha flanked by two disciples, supported by the monkey hero Hanuman
Place of Origin: Thailand
Date: approx. 1825-1875
Materials: Paint and gold on cloth
Dimensions: H. 81 3/4 in x W. 35 in, H. 207.6 cm x W. 88.9 cm (overall)
Credit Line: Gift of John K. Little
Department: Southeast Asian Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: 2015.28
On Display: No

More Information

Inscriptions: The inscription, which follows a standard formula, says that the painting is a pious donation of so-and-so for the Buddhist religion, and adds the donor's hope of someday achieving Nirvana.
Exhibition History: "The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe," Asian Art Museum, October 21, 2015–January 15, 2017
Additional Label:

Why are the Buddha and his disciples shown held aloft by Hanuman, while two ordinary monkeys caper nearby?

This question has no clear answer. The subject is rare, and seems not to have been studied by scholars. But episodes and figures from the Rama epic turn up often in Thai Buddhist contexts. Rama was associated with the Buddha, either as the Buddha-to-be in a previous life or as a more general parallel. So, if Rama is sometimes shown supported or conveyed by Hanuman, then perhaps the Buddha can be too.

At the lower edge of this painting is a damaged inscription. It follows the pattern of dedicatory inscriptions on Thai Buddhist paintings in this format. It says that the painting of the Buddha is given by Mother So-and-So for the Buddhist religion. She hopes that the donation will contribute to her reaching nirvana in the future.

(Exhibition Label from The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe)


Inscriptions: The inscription, which follows a standard formula, says that the painting is a pious donation of so-and-so for the Buddhist religion, and adds the donor's hope of someday achieving Nirvana.
Exhibition History: "The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe," Asian Art Museum, October 21, 2015–January 15, 2017
Expanded Label:

Why are the Buddha and his disciples shown held aloft by Hanuman, while two ordinary monkeys caper nearby?

This question has no clear answer. The subject is rare, and seems not to have been studied by scholars. But episodes and figures from the Rama epic turn up often in Thai Buddhist contexts. Rama was associated with the Buddha, either as the Buddha-to-be in a previous life or as a more general parallel. So, if Rama is sometimes shown supported or conveyed by Hanuman, then perhaps the Buddha can be too.

At the lower edge of this painting is a damaged inscription. It follows the pattern of dedicatory inscriptions on Thai Buddhist paintings in this format. It says that the painting of the Buddha is given by Mother So-and-So for the Buddhist religion. She hopes that the donation will contribute to her reaching nirvana in the future.

(Exhibition Label from The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe)